Are you a vaper who also smokes? Would you be willing to help with an important study at QMUL?

How does dual use of e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes change over time?

The Study:

This study is being run by the Health and Lifestyle Research Unit at Queen Mary University of London, and is funded by Cancer Research UK (CRUK).

Many people who smoke conventional cigarettes also use an e-cigarette and this is called ‘dual use’. Little is known about the way such use develops over time. Most dual users aim to stop smoking altogether, but many people continue using both products. It is not clear at present how many of these dual users stop smoking, at which time point, and what factors help them to stop.

We are inviting up to 500 dual users to take part in a study which aims to gain a greater understanding of these issues. If you take part, we will ask you questions about your vaping and smoking over the telephone or internet at 3 monthly intervals, over a 12-month period. The surveys should take approximately 10 minutes each to complete. You will receive a £15 voucher as compensation for your time. The study is funded for 1 year initially, but if we obtain further funding, we will extend the follow-up period to 10 years.

We hope that the results of this trial will inform what advice doctors and other health professionals give on e-cigarettes in the future.

Who can take part?

You will be able to take part if you are:

  • Aged 18 years or over.
  • Currently using both an e-cigarette and conventional cigarettes either on the same or separate days for at least one day a week, and practiced such use for at least one month.
  • Willing to provide data on your vaping and smoking at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months.
  • Are not currently taking part in another conflicting study.

Thank you for your interest in this study. It is important that you understand what is involved before you consent to take part. There is information at the end of the information leaflet on how to contact the study organiser if you have any questions or concerns. Your participation is completely voluntary and will not affect any access to treatment or services that you may be currently receiving.

If you are interested in taking part please call: 0207 882 5747 (lines are open Monday-Friday, 9-5pm) Or click the link to email us: health-research@qmul.ac.uk

For more information and to apply to take part in this study click here!

 

 

 

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Prof Linda Bauld on E-cigarette use during pregnancy at GFN 2017

Global Forum on Nicotine 2017 – ‘Reducing Harm, Saving Lives’

E-cigarette use during pregnancy – What do we know?

At the June Global Forum on Nicotine event Professor Linda Bauld from the University of Stirling and Deputy Director of the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, presented an update on e-cigarette use during pregnancy. In the presentation Linda highlights the latest research, a brief overview of smoking in pregnancy and why pregnant women who are still smoking should be encouraged to switch to e-cigarettes.

External link for video: E-cigarette use during pregnancy – Professor Linda Bauld

Other links:

Smokefree action’s info-graphic on e-cigarettes in pregnancy

To see other presentations from the conference click here.

Latest press release from UKCTAS:

Vaping may help explain the record fall in UK smoking rates

 

University of Oxford PhD Studentship ~ Developing and testing peer-led interventions to promote switching from smoking to vaping.

Developing and testing peer-led interventions to promote switching from smoking to vaping.

PhD Studentship ~ Closing date: 26th May 2017

Applications are invited from individuals with a strong academic record who wish to develop a career in behavioural or primary care research. The student will join the thriving Health Behaviours team in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences who are working on range of interventions to support harm reduction and smoking cessation.

The project: The rise in popularity of electronic cigarettes (‘e-cigarettes’) in recent years has been accompanied by a growth in the number of virtual ‘vaper’ communities, with people sharing their advice and experiences of e-cigarettes with peers on internet support groups and discussion forums, many of which address ways of reducing or stopping smoking. The rise of peer to peer support is unique to e-cigarettes; no other means of stopping or reducing smoking attracts such passionate engagement from members of the public. This raises the possibility that we could better harness this peer support to enable more people to reduce or stop smoking using e-cigarettes and this project examines this. Continue reading

How safe is vaping? Media coverage, dilemmas and solutions in work and social spaces

As part of on-going work in relation to tobacco harm reduction, Knowledge-Action-Change is organising a series of dialogues, to examine the often contentious issues that attach to the use of electronic cigarettes, or vaping, in workplaces, places of entertainment and public spaces.

The series entitled ‘How safe is vaping? Media coverage, dilemmas and solutions in work and social spaces’ will take place:
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Why these dialogues now?

There is still a lot of debate between scientists and policy makers about the nature, use and safety of nicotine containing products. The media has produced a lot of stories about e-cigarettes, not all of them either accurate, or supported by scientific evidence. Nonetheless these stories have an impact and can influence peoples’ thinking and reactions on issues. This dialogue is a place where everyone can bring their concerns, air them and hopefully become better informed about the products and their use.

Most vapers are former smokers who have switched to this safer way to use nicotine. Professionals working in public health largely accept that this is a much safer form of behaviour – for users and those around them – but there remain concerns about the impact of their use in some circumstances and in this dialogue we aim to identify some of these and try to address them.

What are the dialogues?

These short events are designed to enable interactive discussion and debate – involving public health professionals, academics and scientists, policy makers, consumers, owners and managers of premises and members of the public – on a range of issues surrounding the increasing use of safer nicotine products (including e-cigarettes) as an alternative to smoking.

During each dialogue a panel of speakers, representing different interests, each make short presentations, addressing different issues relating to e-cigarette use. Q&A and discussion involving the audience follow the presentations.

The dialogues are filmed with the proceedings posted on the web, with the aim of providing information to those who might be interested in the subject and to assist those charged with making policy in having a cross-section of views to draw upon.

Previous dialogues: Knowledge-Action-Change has produced a number of dialogues to date and some of these can be viewed here.

Clearing the air around e-cigarettes

Fears that “vaping” is a gateway to tobacco smoking are unfounded, shows a comprehensive review of available evidence on the harms and benefits of electronic or e-cigarettes and vapour devices, released today by University of Victoria’s Centre for Addictions Research of BC (CARBC) in a report called “Clearing the Air.”

Researchers surveyed the rapidly increasing academic literature on e-cigarettes and found evidence that vaping is replacing—rather than encouraging—the smoking of tobacco cigarettes among young people. The CARBC researchers identified 1,622 articles on the topic, of which 170 were relevant to their review. Evidence shows that tobacco use by youth has been declining while use of vapour devices has been increasing.

“Fears of a gateway effect are unjustified and overblown,” says principal investigator Marjorie MacDonald. “From a public health perspective, it’s positive to see youth moving towards a less harmful substitute to tobacco smoking.”

Among their other observations, CARBC researchers found strong evidence that the vapour from e-cigarettes is less toxic than tobacco cigarette smoke. Vapour devices do not release tar, and vapour emissions contain only eighteen of the 79 toxins found in cigarette smoke, including considerably lower levels of certain cancer causing agents and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Almost all substances tested were substantially lower, or not detected, in vapour devices compared to cigarettes.

In addition, vapour from electronic devices is airborne for less than 30 seconds compared to 18 to 20 minutes for tobacco smoke, substantially reducing the time of second-hand exposure.

Researchers caution, however, that some vapour devices may contain potentially concerning levels of metals and particulate matter, noting that there has been insufficient research regarding some significant carcinogens that may still be present.

Finally, they found encouraging evidence that vapour devices could be at least as effective as other nicotine replacements as aids to help tobacco smokers quit.

“The public has been misled about the risks of e-cigarettes,” concludes Tim Stockwell, CARBC director and co-principal investigator. “Many people think they are as dangerous as smoking tobacco but the evidence shows this is completely false.”

A media kit containing author photos, full report (for media only, not for publication), and an infographic is available on Dropbox. An executive summary is available here.

Click here to read the original story on University of Victoria’s website.

Media contacts:
Tim Stockwell (Director, UVic’s Centre for Addictions Research) at 250-472-5445 or timstock@uvic.ca
Marjorie MacDonald (Scientist, UVic’s Centre for Addictions Research/Nursing) at 250-472-4399 or marjorie@uvic.ca
Suzanne Ahearne (University Communications + Marketing) at 250-721-6139 or sahearne@uvic.ca

Last chance to register for the E-Cigarette Summit 2016

There are only a few spaces left for the forthcoming E-Cigarette Summit which will take place in London on 17th November at The Royal Society.  If you would like to view the programme or book a place please go to www.e-cigarette-summit.com .

This year has an unrivalled line up of speakers including Prof Neal Benowitz a global expert on nicotine, Pro David Spiegelhalter who is the Winton Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk from Oxford University and Tom Miller The Attorney General of Iowa, who historically led the successful multibillion dollar lawsuit against the tobacco industry for knowingly misrepresenting the risks of smoking.

At the Summit, AG Miller will look at whether the public are being given accurate information on e-cigarettes.

The key debates this year will include:

  • Communicating Research and Evidence on E-Cigarettes: How do you convey the relative risks of smoking and e-cigarettes based on what is currently known about them?

  • Should Nicotine Use Be Accepted in Society –  What are the absolute and relative risks?

  • Will regulation support or stifle the disruptive potential that e-cigarettes pose to the tobacco industry and smoking?

  • Can there be a balanced debate on e-cigarettes and harm reduction, when there is no consensus on where the “middle ground” lies.

2017 will be a watershed year for electronic cigarettes as new regulations come in to effect across Europe and America.   These first attempts to regulate an entirely novel product category will set the agenda for decades to come and is likely to be viewed as a pivotal era in both tobacco control and combustible tobacco use in the future.  On the International arena, The Summit  is immediately after FCTC COP7 and it will be the first opportunity to examine and discuss the scientific responses and reactions to the likely position that the WHO recommend on e-cigarettes and harm reduction. The importance of this cannot be underestimated. The role that the WHO and the FCTC play in setting public health agendas and tobacco control policies is the single most important framework that those dedicated to reducing smoking related and tobacco death and disease has worked within.

Good regulation and policy is essential to ensure that consumers and the broader public health are protected from corporate invested interests and that products are safe, effective and marketed appropriately. How far regulation has to go to deliver these goals can only be informed by well-structured research and balanced analysis and communication of evidence.  The E-Cigarette Summit has a single aim of facilitating respectful dialogue and thoughtful analysis of the latest evidence in context of public health concerns. Knowing how to accurately convey information to the public, especially adult smokers about the available evidence on the harm of e-cigarettes has also been a contentious issue.  The number of people who believe that vaping is as dangerous as smoking has tripled since 2012, which some would argue is an appropriate caution for an addictive product, but very few scientists would argue that this is an accurate assessment- given the known harms of smoking.

The E-Cigarette Summit provides a unique opportunity to examine the latest research and to discuss how the evidence should be interpreted and communicated to deliver the most effective health strategies to reduce smoking related death and disease.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Prof. Ann McNeill (Chair Person) – Professor of Tobacco Addiction (UKCTAS)
  • Attorney General Tom Miller – Attorney General for Iowa, USA
  • Prof Neal Benowitz – Professor of Medicine and Bioengineering & Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, USA
  • Prof. Jean Francois Etter – Professor of Public Health, University of Geneva, Switzerland
  • Mr Ram Moorthy – Deputy Chair of the BMA board of science, British Medical Association (BMA)
  • Prof. Robert West – Professor of Health Psychology and Director of Tobacco Studies (CRUK)
  • Tim Baxter – Head of Public Health Policy and Strategy Unit, Department of Health (DoH)
  • Martin Dockrell – Tobacco Lead, Public Health England (PHE), Alcohol Drugs and Tobacco
  • Beryl Keeley – E-cigarette Notification Scheme Lead, Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Authority (MHRA)
  • Prof David Spiegelhalter – Winton Professor for the Public Understanding of Risk, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University
  • Tim Phillips – Managing Director, ECigIntelligence.com
  •  Louise Ross – Stop Smoking Services and Tobacco Control Manager, Leicestershire NHS Trust
  • Prof. Marcus Munafo  – Professor of Biological Psychology, University of Bristol
  • Prof. Peter Hajek – Professor of Clinical Psychology, Queen Mary University, London
  • Dr Konstantinos Farsalinos – Researcher, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Centre, Greece
  • Prof. Ricardo Polosa – Director of the Institute for Internal Medicine, University of Catania
  • Prof. Linda Bauld – Professor of Health Policy, University of Stirling and UKCTAS
  • Fraser Cropper – CEO,  Totally wicked and Chair of IBVTA (Independent British Vape Trade Association)
  • Dr Lynne Dawkins – Associate Professor of Psychology, School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University
  • Deborah Arnott – Chief Executive Officer, Action on Smoking (ASH)
  • Prof Scott Leischow – Mayo Clinic, USA
  • Prof. David Abrams – Professor , The John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public

To see the full agenda please go to www.e-cigarette-summit.com