UKCRC Final Report reveals the legacy of public health research centres

By building capacity and capability in public health research, a report shows how the legacy of a UK-wide network of centres of excellence has helped fuel future public health and prevention research.

Since 2008, partners in the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) have invested £37 million in a network of six Public Health Research Centres of Excellence (UKCRC centres) to increase infrastructure, build academic capacity in public health research in the UK and provide a platform to engage with policy and practice.

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The report shows how 10-years of collaborative work by these centres – based in Edinburgh, Belfast, Newcastle, Nottingham, Cambridge and Cardiff – has exceeded expectations of what was thought possible back in 2008.

The UKCRC centres have expanded the pool of early-career researchers and nurtured their talent while creating new opportunities to work across academia, policy and practice. Researchers have gone on to expand their networks and advance their careers, securing fellowships and lectureships, winning awards and promotion. The UKCRC centres have been a strong magnet for leveraging significant additional funding to increase the volume and quality of public health research.

The centres have helped change the way we think about how to align research with the needs of policymakers and practitioners. By pioneering innovative new ways of responding to public health needs and providing rapid response evaluations for policy and practice partners, their work is helping researchers and practitioners to improve public health at a local level.

At the national level, the impact has been wide-reaching, with evidence from centre research programmes influencing the government sugar tax, encouraging healthy transport policies, providing guidance on physical activity, promoting health in schools and playing a leading role in government policy on tobacco smoking and vaping.

Centre collaborations and academic-policy partnerships have changed the public health landscape, paving the way for ambitious new prevention initiatives, like the UK Prevention Research Partnership.

Professor Chris Whitty, Chair of the UKCRC Board and Chief Scientific Adviser for the Department of Health and Social Care, said: This report shows how this initiative has built research capacity in public health in the UK. Considered untried and risky in 2006, the hard work and collaborative spirit of many researchers, managers and students has strengthened evidence-based public health policy and practice. Without these sorts of achievements, it is hard to see how further ambitious investment like the UK Prevention Research Partnership would have been feasible. I am very grateful to all the research directors that drove this forward, and they should be justly proud of their contribution to the field.”

The UKCRC Centres of Excellence:

  • Centre of Excellence for Public Health Northern Ireland (CoENI), Queen’s University Belfast
  • Centre for Exercise, Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), MRC Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge
  • The Centre for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer), Cardiff University
  • The Centre for Translational Research in Public Health in Public Health (Fuse) – a collaboration between Newcastle University, Durham University, Newcastle University, Northumbria University, the University of Sunderland and Teesside University
  • The Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy (SCPHRP), University of Edinburgh
  • The UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS), University of Nottingham.

Read the full UKCRC report (PDF, 4.21MB).

The MRC is a member of the UKCRC, which brings together the NHS, research funders, industry, regulatory bodies, royal colleges, patient groups and academia in a UK-wide environment that facilitates and promotes high-quality clinical research for the benefit of patients. For more information, visit the UKCRC website.

The UKCRC centres funding partners are the MRC, the British Heart Foundation, Cancer Research UK, NIHR, Economic and Social Research Council, the Public Health Agency, Health and Care Research Wales, Welsh Government, the Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office and Wellcome.

See original post on MRC website.

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Alcohol Problems Policy & Practice Masters Module | Kings College London | 4 – 8th Feb 2019

“It was FANTASTIC and I would strongly recommend others to attend”

Leading academics from King’s and across the 13 universities in the UKCTAS will present and discuss the latest evidence. Speakers include Sir Ian Gilmore (Alcohol Health Alliance), Professor Colin Drummond, Professor Mark Petticrew (LSHTM), Katherine Brown (Institute of Alcohol Studies) and Dr. James Nicholls (Alcohol Research UK). Many of the inputs have broader public health relevance beyond alcohol, to other health issues such as tobacco, obesity and inequalities.

After successfully running the module for three years, we are delighted to announce the module will return again in 2019 to King’s College London. In 2019 we will welcome a large number of top class speakers to discuss important areas of this public health issue. With topics ranging from alcohol and pregnancy, alcohol marketing and brief interventions, we can guarantee this course is invaluable to anyone working in this area.

MAIN AIMS OF THE MODULE:

• Enhance students’ understanding of research methods by focusing on current research in alcohol policy and interventions.
• Enable critical appraisal of evidence in alcohol policy interventions.
• Explore the role and perspectives of key stakeholders including the alcohol industry and the role of media and marketing in alcohol use.

PLACES ARE LIMITED!

Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis. Student numbers are capped at 40 to ensure an effective learning experience and teacher-student ratio.
Early bird discounts apply until 14th December 2018.

Applications will not be taken after 1st February 2019.

If you are unsure about its suitability for your needs please contact Dr. Sadie Boniface (sadie.boniface@kcl.ac.uk).

More information: ukctas.net/alcoholmasters

E-cigarettes – does type and frequency of use influence quitting amongst smokers?

Dr Leonie Brose, lead author of the first study, from the IoPPN at King’s College London, said: ‘E-cigarettes are still a relatively new product, so this study adds important information about what happens when they are used alongside tobacco cigarettes. We already know that using an e-cigarette in an attempt to quit smoking increases the chances of success compared to quitting without any support. This study did not test how helpful they are as quitting aids because we looked at smokers who were using them for any reason, including just to cut down on their smoking or in situations when they cannot smoke. But it is encouraging to see that even then, regular e-cigarette use was linked to reduced numbers of lethal cigarettes smoked and increased attempts to quit smoking in the following year.’

The second study extended this by looking at not only how often e-cigarettes were used but also what types were used, measured for the first time at follow up in 2013. E-cigarettes in the UK have been classified into two basic types – ‘cigalikes’ and ‘tank’ models. Cigalikes resemble tobacco cigarettes. They are disposable or use replaceable cartridges. Tank models look quite different from cigarettes and have containers that are refilled with the ‘e-liquid’.

cigalike-vs-tank

In the second study the researchers found that of 587 people using e-cigarettes at the one year follow up, 76 per cent used cigalikes and 24 per cent used tank models. Nearly a third of daily tank users (28 per cent) had quit smoking compared with 13 per cent of those not using an e-cigarette. 11 per cent of daily cigalike users and 9 per cent of non-daily tank users had quit smoking, but these were not significantly different from those not using e-cigarettes.

Non-daily cigalike users were actually less likely to have quit compared with those not using e-cigarettes, with only 5 per cent having quit smoking. The researchers highlight this as a cause for concern because many of the most prominent brands of cigalikes in the UK are now owned by the tobacco industry. A recent study carried out at the IoPPN, funded by Cancer Research UK, found that tobacco industry cigalikes were the most prominent e-cigarettes at the point of sale in small shops.

Read more here: http://www.healthcanal.com/skin-hair-nails/62568-e-cigarettes-does-type-and-frequency-of-use-influence-quitting-amongst-smokers.html

Hello from the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies!

We are a network of thirteen universities (Twelve in the UK and one in New Zealand) funded by the UK Clinical Research Collaboration.Map of all UKCTAS locations in the UK

UKCTAS aims to deliver an international research and policy development portfolio, and build capacity in tobacco and alcohol research.

This blog will be used to share various streams of information coming out of the centre from various sections. Posts will include videos, press releases, images, research reports, radio appearances, lectures or anything that is linked to the work we are doing around Tobacco and Alcohol.

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