Tobacco content still common on UK prime time TV, despite regulations | Research Report

Tobacco content still common on UK prime time TV, despite regulations

Likely to heavily influence young people’s take-up of smoking, say researchers

Tobacco content remains common on UK prime time TV,  cropping up in a third of all programmes, despite advertising and broadcasting regulations designed to protect children from this kind of exposure, reveals research published online in the journal Tobacco Control.

The amount of exposure has hardly changed in five years, and is likely to heavily influence young people’s take-up of smoking, say the researchers.

Tobacco content in film has been covered extensively, but relatively little attention has been paid to its inclusion on prime time TV, despite the fact that children are likely to spend more time watching TV than they are films, they point out.

The researchers therefore analysed the tobacco content of all programmes, adverts, and trailers broadcast on the five national free to air TV channels between 1800 and 2200 hours during the course of three separate weeks in September, October, and November 2015.

Their analysis included any actual or implied use, such as holding a cigarette without smoking it, or making a comment about smoking; smoking/tobacco paraphernalia; and presence of branding in 1 minute intervals. The results were then compared with those of a similar analysis carried out in 2010.

In all, 420 hours of broadcast footage, including 611 programmes, 909 adverts, and 211 trailers, were analysed.

Some 291 broadcasts (17% of all programmes) included tobacco content. The channel with the most tobacco content was Channel 5, and the one with the least was BBC2.

Tobacco content occurred in one in three TV programmes broadcast, and nearly one in 10 (8%) adverts or trailers.

Actual tobacco use occurred in one in eight (12%) programmes, while tobacco related content–primarily no smoking signs–occurred in just 2 percent of broadcasts. Implied use and branding were rare.

 

Although most tobacco content occurred after the 9 pm watershed, it still occurred on the most popular TV channels before then.  And comparison with the previous analysis in 2010 showed that the number of 1 minute intervals containing any tobacco content increased, rising from 731 to 751 in 2015.

Tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, including paid product placement in TV adverts, is banned in the UK, but tobacco imagery in TV programmes and trailers is exempt, and covered instead by media regulator, OfCom’s, broadcasting code.

This code is designed to protect children by restricting depictions of tobacco use in children’s programmes, and preventing the glamorisation of smoking in programmes broadcast before 9 pm.

“Audiovisual tobacco content remains common in prime-time UK television programmes and is likely to be a significant driver of smoking uptake in young people,” emphasise the researchers.

“Guidelines on tobacco content need to be revised and more carefully enforced to protect children from exposure to tobacco imagery and the consequent risk of smoking initiation,” they added.

‘The number of smokers in the UK has fallen significantly since 2010 yet this research finds smoking is just as common on our screens. Given the proven link to childhood smoking Ofcom and the BBFC, which regulate TV and films, need to take the necessary steps to warn parents of the risks and protect our children from the harmful effects of tobacco imagery.’ 

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of Action on Smoking and Health.


Notes for editors:

Research:  Content analysis of tobacco content in UK television doi 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2018-054427

Journal: Tobacco Control

Link to Academy of Medical Sciences press release labelling system: http://press.psprings.co.uk/AMSlabels.pdf

Author contact: Dr Alex Barker, Division of Epidemiology & Public Health, UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. Email: alexander.barker@nottingham.ac.uk

Other links:
Tobacco on TV influences children, study finds | iNews

Smoking scenes are still common in a THIRD of prime time TV programmes despite strict regulations to protect children, finds study | Daily Mail

Advertisements

Stubbing out the public health problem of an era | Blog piece by Tim Coleman | #myresearchlegend

Sir Richard Doll had an illustrious career. Through his efforts, the world learned much about the causes of cancer and the dangers of asbestos, radiation and, of course, smoking. Following his research into smoking and lung cancer during the 1950s, the realisation dawned that tobacco use was the public health problem of the era and not a harmless pastime. We all know what’s happened since. How many other 20th century epidemiologists have had such a transformative impact on peoples’ understanding of the determinants of disease?

myresearchlegendricharddollblog

To what extent do I consider Sir Richard Doll to be a research ‘legend’? I’m not sure I’ve earned the right to bestow that honour, so I’ve taken advice. The Cambridge English Dictionary says a ‘legend’ is “someone very famous and admired, usually because of their ability in a particular area”. Just considering the one area of Doll’s work emphasised above, this is a no-brainer; ‘legend’ threshold is clearly surpassed. Don’t take my word for this, though, Google ‘Richard Doll’ and see if you can find reason to disagree.

Am I hasty in allocating ‘legend’ status? Doll certainly changed the world’s knowledge of many illnesses; shouldn’t an NIHR research legend demonstrate clear NHS impact too? Fortunately Doll’s influence here doesn’t disappoint, even if one again only considers smoking. I am a GP. How would this be different if Sir Richard had never lived? Firstly, I’d probably smoke. A pipe would give me more gravitas than cigarettes and I’d have to either smoke in my consulting room, like some doctors did, or schedule regular ‘pipe breaks’ into my day. I would be blissfully ignorant about harms from smoking and more likely to offer patients cigarettes than help with stopping, even if they developed lung cancer or heart disease.

Smoking Kills

Thankfully, Sir Richard did exist. Although I tried smoking as a teenager, a friend’s mum made me think again and I didn’t ever fully adopt the habit. Immature, teenage me was saved from smoking because Doll had shown how harmful smoking is. Fast forward to my GP work in 2018; again due to Doll, I fully realise that smoking kills my patients and wrecks their lives.

crop.jpgAlso, due to research which was only possible because of his early work, I can offer smokers numerous types of cessation support. It’s even possible to refer on to Stop Smoking Services (SSS) for specialist help, though a major cloud on the horizon is that these vital services are no longer universal; they are endangered.

Through their work at the Statistical research Unit of the MRC, Doll and Hill demonstrated that smoking causes lung cancer; before this smoking was ubiquitous across social classes and many doctors smoked. By 1954, the government accepted the link and the middle classes started quitting in droves. When he died in 2005, Doll would very likely have been delighted that UK smoking rates were falling fast. However, improvements were chiefly amongst the better off, so smoking had become disproportionately concentrated amongst society’s poorest. Given his well-documented non-conformist views, my bet is that he would have been saddened that those with most to gain benefited least from such massive social change. Nevertheless, he might have been heartened by the government’s national and vigorous action against smoking. Back then, although SSS were a very new NHS entity, it was mandatory for Primary Care Trusts to deliver them and SSS were closely performance-managed by the then Department of Health. Any smoker could access services’ evidenced-based support to increase their chances of permanent cessation.

Smoking Prevention

Worldwide, legions of researchers, including me, have followed Doll by trying to find ways of treating or preventing smoking. Few epidemiologists have caused such a seismic shift in the international research agenda. Take a look at the thousands of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) reviewed in the tobacco section of the Cochrane Library. All of these studies test interventions against smoking. This necessary work continues today and NIHR is a leading supporter funding, for example, the largest ever RCTs of Nicotine Replacement Therapy used in pregnancy* or for ‘preloading’.

The NHS is 70. Celebrating research legends is a great idea but it’s important we remember what they did and why they are lauded. It took almost half a century after Doll and Hill’s landmark paper for the NHS to implement national treatment services for smokers, and sadly less than 20 years later these have become an optional extra with patchy coverage across the country. Smoking is less prevalent than in the past but there are still millions of UK citizens who want to stop and can’t manage this alone. Smoking is still a national problem and requires a national NHS response. A crucial component of this response should be to help quitters by giving them the very best support.

Sir Richard’s work has had a great impact, as all research should. The demise of SSS suggests we risk forgetting this when instead we should continue to build on his significant achievements.

*More information on the trial: Double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in pregnancy – SNAP is available on the NIHR Journals Library website.

Tim Coleman, Professor of Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences
University of Nottingham and NIHR Senior Investigator

The NIHR is highlighting seven research legends whose work has shaped the NHS, as part of its celebrations for the NHS’s 70th birthday and the NIHR’s I Am Research campaign.

Original post on NIHR website. – Posted: 04 May 2018

Nicotine & Tobacco: Current issues, Policy and Practice / 21st – 24th May 2018 / University of Stirling

Building on our previous CPD courses on tobacco control and alcohol policy, the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies is delighted to be offering our Nicotine & Tobacco CPD course at the University of Stirling in 2018!

Please note: If you book on/before 28th February 2018, the cost is: £499, or £649 for students seeking accreditation. 

The course, successfully introduced in 2015, is aimed at professionals working in a range of organisations who are interested in public health and policy in the UK or internationally. In addition to the topics covered at previous tobacco CPDs, this year we will be examining the current, up to date evidence on tobacco harm reduction, electronic cigarettes and other nicotine-containing devices.

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

• Describe and discuss patterns of tobacco consumption, prevalence and addiction and the rise of e-cigarette use.
• Assess key milestones in tobacco and nicotine policy and the contribution of policy in developing and implementing effective interventions.
• Critically discuss the role of commercial interests, including the tobacco industry, in promoting tobacco use and recent controversies regarding the e-cigarette industry.
• Describe and discuss the range of effective interventions to reduce tobacco use and the place of tobacco harm reduction, including e-cigarettes, in addressing tobacco use.
• Assess the potential impact of current and emerging tobacco control priorities on different population groups, including tobacco harm reduction approaches.
• Discuss principles of media advocacy as applied to current issues in tobacco control.


*NEW FOR 2018*

ADDITIONAL BREAKOUT SESSIONS RELEVANT TO INTERNATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL!

TAXATION & ILLICIT TOBACCO
Deborah Arnott, Action on Smoking & Health (ASH)
SMOKELESS TOBACCO
Prof. Kamran Siddiqi, University of York
TOBACCO MARKETING
Crawford Moodie, University of Stirling

Upcoming Tobacco & Alcohol courses now taking applications: limited places available!

nottingham

“Tobacco Control Interventions”
29th Jan – 2nd Feb 2018
University of Nottingham

Closing date for applications: 16th January 2018

This year we will be discussing important factors in tobacco control including; youth smoking, the role of the tobacco industry, use of mass media for smoking prevention and cessation, smokefree legislation, harm reduction and the neurobiology of nicotine addiction.


kcl_front_ukctas

“Alcohol, Problems, Policy & Practice” 
5th – 9th February 2018
Kings College London

Early bird deadline: 21st December 2017

The course is a mixture of blended learning, with face-to-face lectures being held in February 2018. It is open to all UKCTAS researchers as well as students of the MSc in Addiction Studies.


stirling-banner

“Nicotine and Tobacco CPD”
21st – 24th May 2018
University of Stirling

Early bird deadline: 28th February 2018

In addition to the topics covered on our previous tobacco control CPD, we will also be examining in detail the current evidence on tobacco harm reduction, electronic cigarettes and other nicotine-containing devices.


More information about these courses can be found on our website @ UKCTAS.net

Are you a vaper who also smokes? Would you be willing to help with an important study at QMUL?

How does dual use of e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes change over time?

The Study:

This study is being run by the Health and Lifestyle Research Unit at Queen Mary University of London, and is funded by Cancer Research UK (CRUK).

Many people who smoke conventional cigarettes also use an e-cigarette and this is called ‘dual use’. Little is known about the way such use develops over time. Most dual users aim to stop smoking altogether, but many people continue using both products. It is not clear at present how many of these dual users stop smoking, at which time point, and what factors help them to stop.

We are inviting up to 500 dual users to take part in a study which aims to gain a greater understanding of these issues. If you take part, we will ask you questions about your vaping and smoking over the telephone or internet at 3 monthly intervals, over a 12-month period. The surveys should take approximately 10 minutes each to complete. You will receive a £15 voucher as compensation for your time. The study is funded for 1 year initially, but if we obtain further funding, we will extend the follow-up period to 10 years.

We hope that the results of this trial will inform what advice doctors and other health professionals give on e-cigarettes in the future.

Who can take part?

You will be able to take part if you are:

  • Aged 18 years or over.
  • Currently using both an e-cigarette and conventional cigarettes either on the same or separate days for at least one day a week, and practiced such use for at least one month.
  • Willing to provide data on your vaping and smoking at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months.
  • Are not currently taking part in another conflicting study.

Thank you for your interest in this study. It is important that you understand what is involved before you consent to take part. There is information at the end of the information leaflet on how to contact the study organiser if you have any questions or concerns. Your participation is completely voluntary and will not affect any access to treatment or services that you may be currently receiving.

If you are interested in taking part please call: 0207 882 5747 (lines are open Monday-Friday, 9-5pm) Or click the link to email us: health-research@qmul.ac.uk

For more information and to apply to take part in this study click here!

 

 

 

UKCTAS researchers awarded multi-million pound grant to tackle tobacco-related harm in Asia & Africa

UKCTAS and the Global Challenges Research Fund

UKCTAS researchers have been awarded a £3.4million grant from Research Councils UK to address tobacco-related harm in Asia and Africa. The programme will run for four years and aims to build capacity for tobacco control research in seven countries in South Asia and Africa.

GCRF-infographicLed by Professor Linda Bauld, UKCTAS Deputy Director based at the University of Stirling, this Global Challenges Research Fund grant provides an example of how UKCTAS is able to bring together members of the UK tobacco control research community to respond to an opportunity to address tobacco use in low and middle income countries.It involves six of the academic teams within the UKCTAS consortia and Cancer Research UK, one of the UKCTAS funders. CRUK is already very active in international tobacco control research.

Professor Bauld said:
Linda_Bauld_UKCTAS.png“UKCTAS has made an important contribution to informing policies and new developments to reduce smoking rates in the UK over the past decade, culminating in the very significant prevalence reductions we’ve seen in the past few years. This is testament to the links we have worked hard to forge with government, NGOs, advocacy groups, professionals and the public who have helped translate our research into practice. Our work on smokefree public places, tobacco taxation, mass media, smoking cessation & stop smoking services, electronic cigarettes & tobacco harm reduction, and our monitoring of tobacco industry activity has all fed into these changes.

Now through this GCRF programme we have a unique opportunity to help build capacity in 7 other countries, all in South Asia and Africa, adding to individual projects and links that UKCTAS members had already forged with some of these teams in recent years. A core element of our Centre has always been training and research development, from PhD through post-doctoral level, training professionals and engaging with stakeholders in the UK and Europe. Now we will be extending this through a substantial new programme of research and capacity building with a particular focus on tobacco taxation, the illicit trade and tobacco industry influence on policy. We will be working with the following list of senior researchers and their teams (below), as well as Alison Cox and her colleagues at Cancer Research UK, over the next four years. We are grateful to Research Councils UK for this opportunity.”

The UK co-applicants on the grant include: Professors John Britton and Andrew Fogarty (Nottingham), Professor Kamran Siddiqi and Dr Steve Parrot (York), Professor Jeff Collin (Edinburgh), Professor Anna Gilmore (Bath) and Professor Ann McNeill (Kings College).

International co-applicants include:

– Dr Wakgari Deressa, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia
– Dr Muralidhar Madhav Kulkarni, Manipal University, India
– Professor Umberto Dalessandro, MRC Unit, the Gambia
– Dr Monika Arora, Public Health Foundation of India
– Dr Ellis Owusudabo, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana
– Kellen Nyamurungi, CTCA, Makerere University, Uganda
– Dr Rumana Hugue, the ARK Foundation, Bangladesh
– Professor Corne van Walbeek, University of Cape Town, South Africa

 

Collaboration info-graphic showing the different organisations involved in the project:

GCRF-UKCTAS-Presentation-diagram

About the GCRF:

The Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) GCRFfullcolourResearch Councils UK Collective Fund is supporting projects in the range of £2 – 8 million over four years. It aims to build upon research knowledge in the UK, and strengthen capacity overseas, to help address challenges, informed by expressed need in the developing countries.

 

Jo Johnson, Minister for Universities and Science, said:
“From healthcare to green energy, the successful projects receiving funding today highlight the strength of the UK’s research base and our leadership in helping developing countries tackle some of the greatest global issues of our time.

“At a time when the pace of scientific discovery and innovation is quickening, we are placing science and research at the heart of our Industrial Strategy to build on our strengths and maintain our status as science powerhouse.”

More information about this grant can be seen on the UKCTAS website.

Notes to editors

· Full list of research partners:
o UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS): Universities of Stirling, Nottingham, York, Edinburgh, Kings College London and Bath.
o Cancer Research UK
o The ARK Foundation, Bangladesh
o Manipal University, India
o The Public Health Foundation of India
o The University of Cape Town, South Africa
o Makerere University, Uganda
o The MRC Unit, The Gambia
o Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia
o Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana

· More details on each of the 37 grants can be found in the Growing research capability to meet the challenges faced by developing countries brochure.

· Find out more about the Institute of Social Marketing: www.stir.ac.uk/health-sciences-sport/research/groups/social-marketing.

· Find out more about the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies: ukctas.net

· Find out more about Cancer Research UK’s international tobacco control programme: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/funding-for-researchers/applying-for-funding/funding-committees/international-tobacco-advisory-group

· Find out more about tobacco consumption via the World Health Organisation: www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs339/en/