Over 200,000 children in England are living with Dependent Drinkers!

New figures released today reveal that over 200,000 children in England are living with dependent drinkers who could benefit from receiving specialist alcohol treatment.

The data from Public Health England estimates that there are 600,000 dependent drinkers who would benefit from treatment, yet only just over 100,000 are currently receiving the help they need.

These figures only cover adults who are most seriously dependent on alcohol. It is currently estimated that around 1.5 million adults in England and Wales have some form of alcohol dependence, and that there are 2.5 million children living with an adult drinking at risky levels.

The PHE data is released alongside a report from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) focused on improving the life chances and job prospects of the least well-off. The Department has said it will increase access to grant funding and introduce peer mentors for those in alcohol treatment to help them get back into work.

The report comes at a time when politicians are increasingly recognising the harm cheap alcohol is doing to the most vulnerable in society. The March budget included a consultation on the introduction of a new tax band designed to increase the price of strong white cider, a product which is predominantly consumed by children and heavy drinkers.

And earlier today a report published by the House of Lords Licensing Committee following an enquiry into the operation of the 2003 Licensing Act recognised the damage being done by cheap alcohol. The report calls for the introduction of a minimum unit price (MUP) for alcohol across the UK if it is introduced in Scotland and proves to be successful. Its introduction is being stalled by legal action being taken by sections of the alcohol industry. The report also calls for an end to multi-buy deals such as three for the price of two, a measure which has proved to be successful in Scotland.

Alcohol health experts welcomed the measures announced by the DWP today and the focus on the most vulnerable and lowest paid, pointing to studies which have shown that the least well off are around five times more likely to die from alcohol-related causes than those at the top of the income bracket.

Experts also called, however, for a wider, population-level approach to improving life and employment opportunities for dependent drinkers alongside greater support for individuals.

Liver physician Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA), said:

“We welcome the Government’s recognition that cheap alcohol is damaging some of the most vulnerable groups in society. The revelation that 200,000 children in England are living with adults in need of specialist help is deeply worrying. We need to make sure people get the support they need once they have a problem with alcohol, for their own sakes and for the sake of their children. But people don’t set out to become dependent drinkers and we need to stop more people from reaching that stage.

“For the greatest impact, the measures announced today should be combined with
measures like minimum unit pricing of alcohol. Studies have shown that setting a minimum price for alcohol would reduce unemployment and bring substantial numbers of unemployed drinkers back into the workforce.

“The government is already taking steps to tackle alcohol dependence in this broader way, with the recent announcement that it will be consulting on increasing the tax on high- strength ciders, drinks which are known to be drunk by the most vulnerable and do disproportionate harm.

“Studies also indicate that MUP would help address health inequalities, with over 80 per cent of lives saved coming from the lowest income groups. At the same time, the measure would not increase the price of alcohol sold in pubs and clubs.”

The Public Health England figures can be found here.
The DWP report, entitled Improving Lives: helping workless families, is available here.


About the Alcohol Health Alliance UK
The Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA) is a group of 50 organisations including the Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of GPs, British Medical Association, Alcohol Concern and the Institute of Alcohol Studies. The AHA works together to:
– Highlight the rising levels of alcohol-related health harm
– Propose evidence-based solutions to reduce this harm
– Influence decision makers to take positive action to address the damage caused by alcohol misuse

@SARG_ScHARR team present Research Rap at UKCTAS Early Career Researchers’ Day!

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**To the tune of Fresh Prince of Bel Air**

From South Yorkshire, born and raised

SARG members examined an alcohol craze

Minimum pricing, taxation galore,

Just a few of the things we like to explore…

We first formed in two thousand and ten

When the MRC gave us money to spend

The Sheffield Alcohol Model we built,

Based on those who were drinking, while wearing a kilt!

We’ve got 15 members in our research group…

But we still like to keep UKCTAS in the loop

We research policy and many other things

So here’s a big list of what we bring…

Policy appraisal and price modelling,

Treatment capacity for heavy drinking,

Understanding why Brits drink a lot

Examining elasticities of what they bought

Adapting our model for tons of nations,

Like Wales, Scotland, and other relations

Developing models to curb tobacco smoking

Preventing risky drinkers from prematurely croaking

Awareness of drinking and cancer risk,

Hearing focus groups shout nanny state, ‘tisk, tisk!’

Reviewing drink guidelines in South London

Improving survey measures of alcohol consumption

Adapting our model for local authorities

Examining harms to others, close families

Defining what is meant by a drinking occasion

Addressing court appeal for EU persuasion

So these are the things SARG is working on now

We hope you enjoyed, now it’s time for the bow

If you have final comments for any one of us,

Please come and shout, future collaborations are a plus!

View more: SARG News and Activities 2015

Alcohol’s Harm to Others in Scotland and North West England – IAS Animated Film

‘In political debates and the media, alcohol consumption is often portrayed as a problem that affects individual drinkers, with a focus on the health and social consequences of heavy and binge drinking. However, alcohol consumption can have a range of negative consequences for people other than the drinker including their families, friends, coworkers and even strangers assaulted in the street or kept up at night.

This short animated film shows the combined results of two surveys carried out in Scotland and the North West of England on the nature and scale of harms that people experience as a result of someone else’s drinking.’

The full report, produced by the Sheffield Alcohol Research Group and funded by the Institute of Alcohol Studies, can be found here. For more information please contact sarg@sheffield.ac.uk.

Places are running out for the UKCTAS Alcohol CPD in September 2015!

sheffield postFollowing on from the extremely successful Alcohol CPD course which was held at the University of Stirling in 2014. This module is aimed at professionals working in a range of organisations who are interested in alcohol policy and practice.

This years course is being held at the University of Sheffield and is taught by several leading academics and practitioners from various UKCTAS institutions and includes a balance of lectures, discussion groups and debates.

It’s a great opportunity to get to know the UK’s Alcohol Research community. Dr John Holmes

Book now to ensure you don’t miss this fantastic opportunity!

For more information: UKCTAS – Alcohol CPD September 2015.