Alcohol-related Hospital Admissions are at a Record High!

New figures released this week shows that hospital admissions due to alcohol are at their highest ever levels.

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The data, summarised in a release from NHS Digital, shows that alcohol-related hospital admissions in England have increased by 64% over the last decade, with an extra 430,000 people being admitted due to alcohol-related causes in 2015/16 compared with 2005/06.

This takes the total number of alcohol-related hospital admissions to over 1.1 million in 2015/16.

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Alcohol is linked to over 60 illnesses and diseases, including heart disease, liver disease and cancer. Figures from the local alcohol profiles for England show that admissions due to liver disease have gone up 57% over the last decade, and that the number of people diagnosed with alcohol-related cancer has increased 8%.

In contrast, separate data released today by the Office of National Statistics shows that the proportion of adults drinking is at its lowest level since 2005, with younger people more likely to be abstaining from alcohol. However, 7.8 million people admit to binge drinking on their heaviest drinking day.

In response to the figures, alcohol health experts called for more to be done in the UK to tackle the health harm done by alcohol.

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Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA), said:

“These figures show that the UK continues to have a dysfunctional relationship with alcohol. We know that over the long term, rates of binge drinking are falling, and more people are choosing to abstain from alcohol. Worryingly, however, these trends do not appear big enough to stop alcohol harm from continuing to rise, and the sharp increase in alcohol-related hospital admissions over the last few years means hundreds of thousands more people each year are experiencing the misery associated with harmful alcohol consumption.

“The data released today should be sobering reading for whoever wins the upcoming general election, and we would urge the next government to make tackling alcohol harm an immediate priority to save lives, reduce harm, and reduce the pressure on the NHS.”

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 The data is available via the following links.

Tobacco Control in England: Reducing Inequalities and Improving NHS Sustainability

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Public Health England and NHS England are hosting three one-day events with a practical focus on the current challenges and how they can be met, discussing implementation of tobacco control interventions and how the NHS can make its contribution, to the benefit not only of millions of smokers but its own sustainability.

London – Tuesday 4 April

Leeds – Wednesday 26 April

Birmingham – Thursday 4 May

Smoking rates in England have been declining steadily in the general adult population in recent years (17%), falling further and faster among young people (8%). However, hidden behind this success is slower progress among certain population groups, including individuals with mental health problems and those on lower incomes. Large geographical variations also remain, including amongst women who smoke during pregnancy.

Smokers from all groups are likely to be high users of healthcare services, with significant financial and capacity related implications. Addressing this will be key to ensuring NHS sustainability.

Reducing smoking is key to ensuring NHS sustainability and with the new national CQUIN for addressing risky behaviours (alcohol and tobacco) and local Sustainability and Transformation Plans, there is a fresh impetus for collective action to reduce the health inequalities caused by smoking.

Aim:

  • to explore opportunities for action across the local system to engage with smokers and support them to quit, tackling health inequalities and reducing the burden on the NHS and social care of smoking-related disease.

Objectives:

  • identify key areas for joint action to tackle smoking and reduce health inequalities
  • understand where smokers are accessing the healthcare system and how this impacts on primary and secondary care services
  • consider the ways in which healthcare professionals can integrate treatment for tobacco dependence into routine care and support smokers to quit

Who should attend?

  • local authority and NHS commissioners
  • CCG leads for acute care, mental health and maternity
  • healthcare and service providers
  • those with responsibility for managing: Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUINS), delivery of Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs), implementation of the stillbirth reduction care bundle
  • regional strategic leads for health improvement and clinical networks

More information and registration!

Kettil Bruun Society 43rd Annual Alcohol Symposium | Sheffield 5-9th June, 2017

The 43rd annual symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society is hosted by the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield. The symposium will be held in the Inox Dine area of the Student’s Union building.

For information about the Kettil Bruun Society, the Symposium, and to register, submit abstracts and book social tours, please click here.

To go straight to registration, please click here.

The conference is generously supported by the Insitute for Alcohol Studies, Alcohol Research UK, and the Society for the Study of Addiction.

The Kettil Bruun Society (KBS):

The principal aims of the Kettil Bruun Society (KBS) are to investigate social, epidemiological and cross-cultural research on alcohol use, to promote the exchange of scientific knowledge and experiences among researchers from various disciplines and to encourage international collaboration. The comparison of social and epidemiological developments found in different countries makes it possible to disentangle major trends from underlying patterns of alcohol use. This is particularly useful for the development of effective strategies to regulate alcohol use – an aspect which is of great interest to many countries.

The Symposium:

The primary purpose of the symposium is to provide a forum for researchers involved in studies on alcohol to exchange ideas about their ongoing research. The scope of the symposium includes studies of determinants and consequences of drinking, drinking culture and drinking patterns, social and institutional responses to drinking related harms, prevention and care. Empirical research, theoretical papers and reviews of the literature are welcome. Social and epidemiological studies have to be interpreted in a broad context as they include research in a variety of disciplines, such as psychology, sociology, criminology, economics, history and other sciences. Papers on other forms of substance use such as tobacco and drugs are also accepted, particularly papers considering the way they relate to alcohol use.

The symposium focuses on the discussion of papers that are pre-circulated electronically on this website. The author introduces the paper in a 10-minute segment, followed by prepared comments from a discussant and general audience participation. Any person submitting a paper may be asked to be a discussant or chair of a session.

Abstracts:

Please submit an abstract by 20 January 2017. The word limit for the abstract is 250 words and you should also include a conflict of interest statement and a maximum of three keywords (these are not included in the word count). For reports of empirical research, the abstract should be structured into sections: introduction, methods, results and conclusion.

All abstracts must include a conflict of interest statement. This should identify any author who has a relationship (financial or otherwise) which could be viewed as presenting a potential conflict of interest and give a full disclosure of this relationship.  If there are no conflicts of interest to report, please write ‘None’.

If you know in advance that you will only be able to attend the conference on certain days then please use the option in the submission form to indicate this and we will try to accommodate you when scheduling sessions.

 

Alcohol, Problems, Policy and Practice Course returns to King’s College London in February 2017

After a successful launch of the module in February 2016 we are delighted to announce the Alcohol, Problems, Policy and Practice module will return in 2017 to King’s College London. In 2017 we have confirmed a large number of top class speakers to discuss important areas of this public health issue. With topics ranging from alcohol and pregnancy, alcohol marketing and brief interventions, we can guarantee this course is invaluable to anyone working in this area.

 

MAIN AIMS OF THE MODULE:flyer2017amm

• Enhance students’ understanding of research methods by focusing on current research in alcohol policy and interventions.
• Enable critical appraisal of evidence in alcohol policy interventions.
• Explore the role and perspectives of key stakeholders including the alcohol industry and the role of media and marketing in alcohol use.

WHO IS ORGANISING THE COURSE?

This module is coordinated by the Addictions Department at King’s College London jointly with the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS) and has been facilitated by Prof. Ann Mcneill, Dr. Niamh Fitzgerald and Dr. Sadie Boniface.

WHO IS PRESENTING?

Leading academics from King’s College London and across the 13 universities in the UKCTAS will present and discuss the latest evidence. Speakers will also include Dr. Matt Egan (LSHTM), Dr. Zarnie Khadjesari (KCL), Prof. Gerard Hastings (Stirling), Prof. Ann McNeill (KCL), Dr. Niamh Fitzgerald (Stirling), Dr. Ben Hawkins (LSHTM) and many others. Many of the inputs have broader public health relevance beyond alcohol, to other health issues such as tobacco, obesity and inequalities. An updated programme will be available later in 2016.

HOW WILL THE COURSE BE STRUCTURED?

The module will be delivered via blended learning with online materials available from January 2017, followed by a week of classroom sessions the week commencing 6th February 2017.

WHO CAN ATTEND?

In 2017 we will be opening the course to UKCTAS affiliated organisations and those working in public health, community safety or a related field. If you are unsure about its suitability for your needs or for information about fees, please contact Dr. Sadie Boniface (sadie.boniface@kcl.ac.uk)

PLACES ARE LIMITED!

Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.
Student numbers are capped at 40 to ensure an effective learning experience and teacher-student ratio.
Early bird discounts apply until 17th November 2016.
Applications will not be taken after 6th January 2017.

More information is available on our website!

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Research associate position available at the University of Bath | Tobacco Control Research Group | Fixed Term

bathThe University of Bath is seeking to appoint a Research Associate in Public Health/Applied Policy Research based at the University of Bath’s Tobacco Control Research Group within the Department for Health, which is part of the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTCS).

The successful applicant will be working on an exciting project, funded by Cancer Research UK, on researching the activities of the tobacco industry, predominantly in the UK but also internationally, as and where necessary. The new post-holder will work as part of a small research team for the University’s widely acclaimed knowledge exchange platform, TobaccoTactics.org, helping the research leader ensure the website’s quality, relevance and timeliness. The Research Associate will also be expected to contribute to and publish their research in high-impact journals in collaboration with other members of the Tobacco Control Research Group and present their work at conferences and events where relevant.

The successful candidate will hold a PhD in a relevant subject (e.g. public health, international relations, political and social sciences, business studies, law, and business), or an equivalent professional qualification and significant relevant experience where applicable. The candidate will ideally have a track record in undertaking mixed methods research and must be highly motivated and committed. Experience in effective knowledge exchange and writing for diverse audiences to secure research impact would be advantageous. Ideally you will have experience of undertaking policy related research in tobacco control or a very similar area.

This is a full time position, fixed-term for up to 9 months.

For more information and to apply click here.

Electronic cigarettes could have a huge effect on public health | Marcus Munafo, University of Bristol

June 20, 2016 2.17pm BST – Marcus Munafo – The Conversation

Tobacco still kills 6m people around the world every year. Despite huge public health efforts to help people quit and prevent young people starting, smoking remains the single greatest cause of ill health and premature death. And even with restrictions on tobacco advertising and smoking in public places, many young people continue to take up smoking. The situation is even worse in poorer countries, where support to stop smoking is limited, and tobacco control policies weaker.

So in light of this, how should we view the increasing popularity of electronic cigarettes?

image-20160620-8853-1qda1qwThe gadgets deliver a nicotine hit by heating a nicotine-containing propylene glycol (e-liquid) to create an aerosol (usually called “vapour”), which is inhaled. Put simply, they deliver nicotine almost as effectively as a conventional cigarette, but without the vast majority of other chemicals present in tobacco smoke (either from the tobacco itself, or as a result of the burning process).

A whole culture is emerging around “vaping”. Many devices offer a range of power settings, and a vast array of e-liquids is on offer, with varying nicotine contents and flavours. Enthusiasts often apply modifications to their devices, and engage in “cloud chasing” – competing to produce the largest and most interesting clouds of vapour. And yes, young people are experimenting with e-cigarettes (in the same way that they have always experimented with pretty much everything), although at the moment there is no strong evidence this is leading to subsequent cigarette use, or even long-term e-cigarette use.

The rapid growth in use of e-cigarettes, especially among smokers trying to cut down or quit, has taken the public health community and the tobacco industry by surprise. Both are struggling to catch up. Health professionals are hurrying to carry out research to develop evidence-based guidelines and policies. Meanwhile, the tobacco industry is buying up e-cigarette companies and introducing its own products onto the market.

So how concerned should we be about this emerging and disruptive technology?

Should we encourage existing smokers to use e-cigarettes to help them stop smoking, even if this means they continue using nicotine long-term? In the United Kingdom there is some consensus that smokers should be encouraged to use e-cigarettes if they feel they might help, and the National Centre for Smoking Cessation and Training is supportive of their use. Part of the reason many vapers feel so passionately about the subject (and react strongly when they feel that vaping is being unfairly attacked) is that for the first time, through the use of e-cigarettes, they have felt able to take control of their nicotine habit, stop smoking, and reassert some control over their health, without being medicalised in the process.

But a problem remains in the lack of information on the possible harm of e-cigarettes. This is unlikely to change any time soon, since the health effects of tobacco use can take several decades to emerge, and it’s probable the same will be true for e-cigarettes. Nothing is entirely risk-free, but the vastly reduced number of chemicals present in e-cigarette vapour compared to tobacco smoke means we can be confident that vaping will be much, much less harmful than smoking.

Heartening evidence

As part of the investigation into the effects of e-cigarettes, we investigated how the cells found in the arteries of the heart, known as human coronary artery endothelial cells, responded when they were exposed to both e-cigarette vapour and conventional cigarette smoke. We found the cells showed a clear stress response from the cigarette smoke, but not from the electronic cigarette. This suggests tobacco smokers may be able to reduce immediate tobacco-related harm by switching from conventional cigarettes to e-cigarettes.

Many people find it difficult to function without their first caffeine hit of the day. But no one is seriously calling for coffee shops to be dismantled or regulated. Nicotine is addictive, but much less so on its own than in tobacco, where other chemicals enhance its effect. At the doses consumed by vapers the harm is likely to be very low (although we need to continue to research this), and many vapers actually gradually move to zero nicotine content e-liquids, even while continuing to vape.

Of course, we may end up with a large population of long-term nicotine users who use e-cigarettes to deliver nicotine rather than cigarettes, but all of the evidence at the moment suggests that this population will almost entirely comprise ex-smokers. This would produce a vast public health gain.

We must be careful not to restrict smokers’ access to e-cigarettes, or over-state the potential harm of their use, if this will put people off making the transition from smoking to vaping. To do so would deny us one of the greatest public health improving opportunities of the last 50 years.

Original post – The Conversation | More on E-cigarettes from UKCTAS

New research from ASH Wales Cymru shows e-cigarettes are not a gateway to smoking for young people

New research released today shows no evidence that e-cigarettes are a ‘gateway’ for young people to start smoking. The annual survey, by tobacco control campaign group, ASH Wales Cymru, questioned more than 830, 11 to 18 year olds across Wales.

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For the third year running the survey shows there is no link between youths vaping and starting smoking tobacco.

It has been a concern among health professionals since the rapid emergence of e-cigarettes that they would ‘renormalise’ smoking and act as a ‘gateway’ towards tobacco for young people.

Of the young people who reported using both e-cigarettes and tobacco cigarettes at some point, 90% had used tobacco first, suggesting the absence of any ‘gateway’ theory. The report confirms e-cigarette use is confined to current smokers or ex-smokers and they are rarely used among ‘never’ smokers.

It also showed more than 30% of the e-cigarette users had quit smoking altogether. Reasons for using e-cigarettes varied from taste, to friends using them, to wanting to know what they were like.

Young people from the poorest parts of Wales were 25% more likely to have used an e-cigarette compared to their counterparts in the least deprived areas of the country.

These statistics around use by young people match recent results around adult usage from the Welsh Health Survey 2015.

This was the first time the Welsh Health Survey had looked at e-cigarette use. It revealed that 6% of over 16’s stated they currently use an e-cigarette – 140,000 of the Welsh population. Use among never smokers was negligible at 0.06%.

Suzanne Cass, Chief Executive of ASH Wales:

“For the third year in a row our research confirms young people are not using e-cigarettes if they’ve never smoked before.”

“E-cigarettes can contain highly addictive nicotine and there is no need for young non-smokers to use the devices. We are pleased to see these latest results confirm that e-cigarettes are being used as a smoking cessation device, similar to nicotine patches or gum and at the moment are not acting as a gateway towards tobacco.  E-cigarette users are now reducing the harm to their bodies caused by poisonous and cancer-causing tobacco smoke.”

Professor Linda Bauld from the University of Stirling and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies:

“There is a lot of confusion about the relationship between e-cigarettes and smoking in young people. Surveys from other countries do keep claiming there is a link despite youth smoking rates continuing to fall in the countries where these studies take place. This new data from Wales should reassure people that although young people are experimenting with e-cigarettes, we are not seeing regular use in never smokers. Meanwhile, youth smoking rates in Wales continue to decline, which is key to preventing cancer and other diseases that smoking causes.”

Ruth Coombs, Head of British Heart Foundation (BHF) Cymru:

“We are pleased that latest ASH Wales Cymru findings highlight encouraging trends to show that young people in Wales are not turning to e-cigarettes as a way to start smoking but rather as a way to reduce harm caused by intake of tobacco by cigarettes.”

 

Principal Findings:

  •  In terms of awareness of e-cigarettes, a large majority of respondents (90.7%) were aware of e-cigarettes. When stratified by age and gender the awareness of e-cigarettes remained extremely high. As many as 88.5% of respondents under the age of 13 were aware of what an e-cigarette is.
  • The most common sources of finding out about e-cigarettes were: seeing strangers using them in public (45.9%), reading or hearing about them on the internet or social media (42.6%), being told about them by friends (42.5%), and seeing them or hearing about them in the media (42.5%). By contrast only a very small proportion of respondents found out about e-cigarettes from a youth worker (3.3%) or health professional (3.0%).
  • The majority of respondents (68.6%) have never used an e-cigarette, with 13.7% only using an e-cigarette once and just 10% currently using an e-cigarette. A higher percentage of males reported currently using e-cigarettes every day (6.8%) relative to females (2.2%).
  • Respondents from the most deprived parts of Wales were far less likely to have never used an e-cigarette (48.6%) relative to respondents located in the least deprived areas of the country (75.4%).
  • The vast majority of never smokers have also never used an e-cigarette (88.9%), with a further 8.2% only ever having tried an e-cigarette once. Just 0.6% of never smokers currently use e-cigarettes regularly (i.e. more than once a week).
  • The main reasons for using e-cigarettes for the first time were to see what they tasted like (48.7%), because friends were using them (40.1%), and for a bit of fun (30.7%). 22.1% of respondents cited using e-cigarettes to reduce their intake of tobacco cigarettes.
  • The vast majority of respondents (90.3%) who had used e-cigarettes and smoked tobacco cigarettes reported starting to smoke tobacco cigarettes first.
  • Of the respondents who had used e-cigarettes and smoked tobacco cigarettes at some point (n = 172) 25.0% smoked fewer tobacco cigarettes since starting to use e-cigarettes, with 34.3% of respondents ceasing to smoke tobacco cigarettes altogether.

View the reportSee more on e-cigarettes | Other research from ASH Wales