New evidence finds standardised cigarette packaging may reduce the number of people who smoke as UK legislation bans the use of branding on all cigarette packets from May 2017.

A Cochrane Review published today finds standardised tobacco packaging may lead to a reduction in smoking prevalence and reduces the appeal of tobacco.

According to the World Health Organisation, tobacco use kills more people worldwide than any other preventable cause of death. Global health experts believe the best way to reduce tobacco use is by stopping people starting to use tobacco and encouraging and helping existing users to stop.

plain-packs-620-x-348-heroThe introduction of standardised (or ‘plain’) packaging was recommended by the World Health Organisation, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) guidelines. This recommendation was based on evidence around tobacco promotion in general and studies which examined the impact of changes in packaging on knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviour. Standardised tobacco packaging places restrictions on the appearance of tobacco packs so that there is a uniform colour (and in some cases shape) with no logos or branding apart from health warnings and other government-mandated information, and the brand name appears in a prescribed uniform font, colour and size.

From next month, UK legislation on standardised packaging for all tobacco packs comes into full effect.

Australia was the first country in the world to implement standardised packaging of tobacco products.  The laws, which took full effect there in December 2012, also required enlarged pictorial health warnings.

A team of Cochrane researchers from the UK and Canada have summarised results from studies that examine the impact of standardised packaging on tobacco attitudes and behaviour. They have today published their findings in the Cochrane Library.

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The international symposium looking at Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems & Smoking Cessation

La Rochelle – France

December 1st & 2nd, 2016

Tobacco will be the leading cause of death in the 21st century, and projections by the World Health Organization (WHO) are nothing short of alarming: 600 million deaths world-wide. The WHO considers smoking as “one of the most serious threats that ever faced mankind”.
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The e-cig symposium was created in this context and will present the latest research results on the potential of new electronic nicotine delivery devices in the form of electronic cigarettes, and more broadly, of aerosol therapy. Devices which, for the first time, may reveal potentially effective treatment solutions to stop smoking with confort and pleasure.
The e-cig symposium has clear objectives : gathering medical, scientific, and technical research to review and summarise the studies done on electronic cigarettes, and more globally on electronic nicotine delivery devices used as an alternative to tobacco smoking.
The e-cig event will:
  • present the latest research results on the potential of new electronic nicotine delivery devices in the form of electronic cigarettes, and more broadly, of aerosol therapy. Devices which, for the first time, may reveal potentially effective treatment solutions  to quit smoking with comfort and pleasure.
  • provide the latest research developments on the effectiveness and safety evaluation methods of electronic cigarettes, as well as on the standards and regulations of these products.
  • gather both public and private physicians and researchers working on topics directly or indirectly related to the delivery of nicotine and smoking cessation.

Who’s going to be there?

attendees.pngCall for communications is open: Be part of the e-cig panel speakers : +60 oral communications will be selected from the call for papers. Submit your paper below!

Program at a glance | Submit your abstract | More information

Are e-cigarettes a gateway to tobacco smoking in youth? @Mental_Elf

Matt Field from University of Liverpool discussing the proposal that e-cig’s are a gateway to tobacco smoking in young people.

“Arguments about electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and what do about them rumble on. I won’t wade into the broader debate, but I direct you to a recent viewpoint article (McKee and Capewell, 2015), and accompanying commentaries (particularly McNeill et al., 2015).

The main arguments involve the safety of e-cigarettes (relative to smoking regular cigarettes and relative to, well, breathing air), their effect on renormalisation of tobacco smoking when its prevalence is declining, their role as smoking cessation aids, and their use by young people.

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“All evidence shows that e-cigarettes have potential to reduce the harms caused by smoking”

A landmark review led by King’s College London finds that all evidence shows that e-cigarettes have the potential to reduce smoking. The report shows that almost all of the 2.6 million adults using e-cigarettes in Great Britain – one in 20 of the population – are current or ex-smokers, most of whom are using the devices to help them quit smoking or to prevent them going back to cigarettes. phe80% of smokers believe e-cigarettes are a good way of quitting smoking.

Dr Leonie Brose
 ‘Smokers who have tried other methods of quitting without success could be encouraged to try e-cigarettes to stop smoking and stop smoking services should support smokers using e-cigarettes to quit by offering them behavioral support. Encouraging smokers who cannot or do not want to stop smoking to switch to e-cigarettes could help reduce smoking related disease, death and health inequalities.’

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