Tobacco Control in England: Reducing Inequalities and Improving NHS Sustainability

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Public Health England and NHS England are hosting three one-day events with a practical focus on the current challenges and how they can be met, discussing implementation of tobacco control interventions and how the NHS can make its contribution, to the benefit not only of millions of smokers but its own sustainability.

London – Tuesday 4 April

Leeds – Wednesday 26 April

Birmingham – Thursday 4 May

Smoking rates in England have been declining steadily in the general adult population in recent years (17%), falling further and faster among young people (8%). However, hidden behind this success is slower progress among certain population groups, including individuals with mental health problems and those on lower incomes. Large geographical variations also remain, including amongst women who smoke during pregnancy.

Smokers from all groups are likely to be high users of healthcare services, with significant financial and capacity related implications. Addressing this will be key to ensuring NHS sustainability.

Reducing smoking is key to ensuring NHS sustainability and with the new national CQUIN for addressing risky behaviours (alcohol and tobacco) and local Sustainability and Transformation Plans, there is a fresh impetus for collective action to reduce the health inequalities caused by smoking.

Aim:

  • to explore opportunities for action across the local system to engage with smokers and support them to quit, tackling health inequalities and reducing the burden on the NHS and social care of smoking-related disease.

Objectives:

  • identify key areas for joint action to tackle smoking and reduce health inequalities
  • understand where smokers are accessing the healthcare system and how this impacts on primary and secondary care services
  • consider the ways in which healthcare professionals can integrate treatment for tobacco dependence into routine care and support smokers to quit

Who should attend?

  • local authority and NHS commissioners
  • CCG leads for acute care, mental health and maternity
  • healthcare and service providers
  • those with responsibility for managing: Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUINS), delivery of Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs), implementation of the stillbirth reduction care bundle
  • regional strategic leads for health improvement and clinical networks

More information and registration!

Women & Alcohol | Edinburgh and London-Based Seminar Series | 2017

The Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) and the Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems (SHAAP) are co-hosting a four part seminar series to discuss issues relating to women and alcohol.

Each session will be chaired by an eminent academic, who will invite three guest speakers to present their personal responses to three pre-set questions, which are relevant to the topic.

These events will provide an opportunity for policy makers, academics, activists, and media representatives to critically discuss topics related to women and alcohol use. The intention is to stimulate thinking, challenge some attitudes and perceptions, and to think about future research and policy priorities.

Seminar 1: Friday, 10th March 2017

Women, Alcohol, and Globalisation.
Royal College of Physicians, London, 2 – 4pm

Chair: Dr. Cecile Knai, Associate Professor of Public Health Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  • How does alcohol marketing influence women’s behaviours?
  • How does alcohol marketing influence attitudes towards women?
  • How does alcohol affect women in different social and cultural contexts?

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How safe is vaping? Media coverage, dilemmas and solutions in work and social spaces

As part of on-going work in relation to tobacco harm reduction, Knowledge-Action-Change is organising a series of dialogues, to examine the often contentious issues that attach to the use of electronic cigarettes, or vaping, in workplaces, places of entertainment and public spaces.

The series entitled ‘How safe is vaping? Media coverage, dilemmas and solutions in work and social spaces’ will take place:
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Why these dialogues now?

There is still a lot of debate between scientists and policy makers about the nature, use and safety of nicotine containing products. The media has produced a lot of stories about e-cigarettes, not all of them either accurate, or supported by scientific evidence. Nonetheless these stories have an impact and can influence peoples’ thinking and reactions on issues. This dialogue is a place where everyone can bring their concerns, air them and hopefully become better informed about the products and their use.

Most vapers are former smokers who have switched to this safer way to use nicotine. Professionals working in public health largely accept that this is a much safer form of behaviour – for users and those around them – but there remain concerns about the impact of their use in some circumstances and in this dialogue we aim to identify some of these and try to address them.

What are the dialogues?

These short events are designed to enable interactive discussion and debate – involving public health professionals, academics and scientists, policy makers, consumers, owners and managers of premises and members of the public – on a range of issues surrounding the increasing use of safer nicotine products (including e-cigarettes) as an alternative to smoking.

During each dialogue a panel of speakers, representing different interests, each make short presentations, addressing different issues relating to e-cigarette use. Q&A and discussion involving the audience follow the presentations.

The dialogues are filmed with the proceedings posted on the web, with the aim of providing information to those who might be interested in the subject and to assist those charged with making policy in having a cross-section of views to draw upon.

Previous dialogues: Knowledge-Action-Change has produced a number of dialogues to date and some of these can be viewed here.

Report launch: New issues and age-old challenges: a review of young people’s relationship with tobacco | 27/02/17

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Join Prof Amanda Amos and Prof Marcus Munafo to discuss the current landscape, challenges and opportunities including a focus on young people, tobacco and mental health.

Please book your free please here>

The face of youth smoking in the UK is evolving.  Young people are growing up in a society radically disrupted by new technologies and societal norms, which are reshaping their perceptions of personal health, image, and values.

New issues and age-old challenges: a review of young people’s relationship with tobacco, brings together the available evidence on youth smoking and articulates a clear demand for action across the system.

Martin Dockrell from Public Health England will chair the panel session.

Full agenda is available here>

Kettil Bruun Society 43rd Annual Alcohol Symposium | Sheffield 5-9th June, 2017

The 43rd annual symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society is hosted by the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield. The symposium will be held in the Inox Dine area of the Student’s Union building.

For information about the Kettil Bruun Society, the Symposium, and to register, submit abstracts and book social tours, please click here.

To go straight to registration, please click here.

The conference is generously supported by the Insitute for Alcohol Studies, Alcohol Research UK, and the Society for the Study of Addiction.

The Kettil Bruun Society (KBS):

The principal aims of the Kettil Bruun Society (KBS) are to investigate social, epidemiological and cross-cultural research on alcohol use, to promote the exchange of scientific knowledge and experiences among researchers from various disciplines and to encourage international collaboration. The comparison of social and epidemiological developments found in different countries makes it possible to disentangle major trends from underlying patterns of alcohol use. This is particularly useful for the development of effective strategies to regulate alcohol use – an aspect which is of great interest to many countries.

The Symposium:

The primary purpose of the symposium is to provide a forum for researchers involved in studies on alcohol to exchange ideas about their ongoing research. The scope of the symposium includes studies of determinants and consequences of drinking, drinking culture and drinking patterns, social and institutional responses to drinking related harms, prevention and care. Empirical research, theoretical papers and reviews of the literature are welcome. Social and epidemiological studies have to be interpreted in a broad context as they include research in a variety of disciplines, such as psychology, sociology, criminology, economics, history and other sciences. Papers on other forms of substance use such as tobacco and drugs are also accepted, particularly papers considering the way they relate to alcohol use.

The symposium focuses on the discussion of papers that are pre-circulated electronically on this website. The author introduces the paper in a 10-minute segment, followed by prepared comments from a discussant and general audience participation. Any person submitting a paper may be asked to be a discussant or chair of a session.

Abstracts:

Please submit an abstract by 20 January 2017. The word limit for the abstract is 250 words and you should also include a conflict of interest statement and a maximum of three keywords (these are not included in the word count). For reports of empirical research, the abstract should be structured into sections: introduction, methods, results and conclusion.

All abstracts must include a conflict of interest statement. This should identify any author who has a relationship (financial or otherwise) which could be viewed as presenting a potential conflict of interest and give a full disclosure of this relationship.  If there are no conflicts of interest to report, please write ‘None’.

If you know in advance that you will only be able to attend the conference on certain days then please use the option in the submission form to indicate this and we will try to accommodate you when scheduling sessions.

 

Dr Jo Cranwell discusses alcohol content & advertising in the media at a meeting of the European Parliament | University of Bath

Dr Jo Cranwell, Assistant Professor in Public Health at the University of Bath and UKCTAS research fellow delivered the keynote presentation at a meeting of the European Parliament held to discuss the revision of the Audio Visual Media Services Directive. (The EU’s Audiovisual Media Services Directive governs EU-wide coordination of national legislation on all audiovisual media, both traditional TV broadcasts and on-demand services.)

Jo was invited as a keynote speaker to discuss the work conducted by researchers at the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies on alcohol content and advertising in traditional and digital media.

Here are a few pictures from the meeting:

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To see more about tobacco and alcohol content in the media click here!

Reducing Alcohol Consumption: guidelines, local government and smartphone apps

An NIHR School for Public Health Research and UCL Centre for Behaviour Change event.

This event brought together researchers and practitioners in the field of excessive alcohol consumption reduction. Various speakers (from different institutions) discussed the latest research evidence and research evidence gaps. This was followed by a lively debate in the networking reception.

Available now are the presentations from the event and a summary of the social media coverage.

Speakers at the event:

  • Prof. Bernie Hannigan (PHE)
  • Dr John Holmes (ScHARR)
  • Prof. Matt Hickmann (University of Bristol)
  • Dr Jamie Brown (UCL)
  • Dr Gautam Mehta (UCLH)
  • Prof. Eileen Kaner (FUSE)

For more information on the event see the agenda & further information sheet.

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