Are you a vaper who also smokes? Would you be willing to help with an important study at QMUL?

How does dual use of e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes change over time?

The Study:

This study is being run by the Health and Lifestyle Research Unit at Queen Mary University of London, and is funded by Cancer Research UK (CRUK).

Many people who smoke conventional cigarettes also use an e-cigarette and this is called ‘dual use’. Little is known about the way such use develops over time. Most dual users aim to stop smoking altogether, but many people continue using both products. It is not clear at present how many of these dual users stop smoking, at which time point, and what factors help them to stop.

We are inviting up to 500 dual users to take part in a study which aims to gain a greater understanding of these issues. If you take part, we will ask you questions about your vaping and smoking over the telephone or internet at 3 monthly intervals, over a 12-month period. The surveys should take approximately 10 minutes each to complete. You will receive a £15 voucher as compensation for your time. The study is funded for 1 year initially, but if we obtain further funding, we will extend the follow-up period to 10 years.

We hope that the results of this trial will inform what advice doctors and other health professionals give on e-cigarettes in the future.

Who can take part?

You will be able to take part if you are:

  • Aged 18 years or over.
  • Currently using both an e-cigarette and conventional cigarettes either on the same or separate days for at least one day a week, and practiced such use for at least one month.
  • Willing to provide data on your vaping and smoking at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months.
  • Are not currently taking part in another conflicting study.

Thank you for your interest in this study. It is important that you understand what is involved before you consent to take part. There is information at the end of the information leaflet on how to contact the study organiser if you have any questions or concerns. Your participation is completely voluntary and will not affect any access to treatment or services that you may be currently receiving.

If you are interested in taking part please call: 0207 882 5747 (lines are open Monday-Friday, 9-5pm) Or click the link to email us: health-research@qmul.ac.uk

For more information and to apply to take part in this study click here!

 

 

 

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Alcohol and breast cancer – How big is the risk? ~ Report from the World Cancer Research Fund

Half a glass of wine a day increases breast cancer‘ was just one of the headlines this WCRF_main-150x150week, which discussed a report that reinforced the evidence that alcohol can increase a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer.

The report from the World Cancer Research Fund outlined the latest evidence on how we can reduce that risk – focusing on weight, physical activity and drinking.

The WCRF studies all the evidence on a potential risk and decides whether it’s strong enough to be a basis for making recommendations to the public.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, and 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives. And since we know that almost a third of breast cancer cases in the UK could be prevented, largely by changes to lifestyle, this is important stuff.

While the cause of an individual’s cancer can never be certain, there are still things you can do to reduce your risk. And evidence like this is the first step to helping women to do just that.

So what exactly does the report say?

Alcohol

The report backs up previous research showing that drinking alcohol can cause 7 types of cancer  including breast cancer. Even though it’s in the headlines, this is nothing new.

While the reports may sound alarming, we also know that the more you cut down, the more you’re reducing your risk.

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Although most women don’t regularly drink very large amounts of alcohol, thousands of cases of cancer – including breast – are linked to alcohol each year.

There are 3 good theories on the link between alcohol and cancer which we’ve written about before.

  • When we drink alcohol, it’s broken down into a toxic chemical called acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde can damage the DNA inside our cells, and then prevent damage from being repaired. This is important because it allows cancer to develop.
  • Alcohol can increase the levels of certain hormones in the body, including oestrogen. We know that high levels of oestrogen can fuel the development of breast cancer, so this might be particularly important here.
  • Alcohol also makes it easier for cells in the mouth and throat to absorb other cancer-causing chemicals. This is probably more important for other cancer types linked to alcohol rather than breast cancer.

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Physical activity

The evidence on the link between breast cancer risk and both weight and physical activity is a bit more complicated. This is because there is evidence that the causes of breast cancer that occur in women before the menopause, compared to after the menopause, are different.

But overall there is strong evidence that keeping a healthy weight and being physically active, can help prevent breast cancer.

Unlike its previous report, this time WCRF says that some forms of physical activity probably reduce the risk for pre-menopausal breast cancer But the finding is only true for ‘vigorous’ activity – exercise which gets you breathing hard and your heart beating fast, so that you won’t be able to say more than a few words without pausing for breath.

The report also adds to the existing evidence that physical activity at any age is related to a lower risk of breast cancer in women after the menopause. This can be anything that gets you a bit hot and out of breath – from fast walking, to cycling, or even heavy housework. And the more you do the better.

Body weight

The evidence on weight and breast cancer is also complicated: as your risk changes depending on the ages at which you were overweight.

But overall the report agrees with previous work showing that being overweight or obese throughout adulthood causes postmenopausal breast cancer, something that is already well established.

Bringing it all together

Other things that affect a woman’s breast cancer risk are less easy to control. As with most cancers, the risk of developing the disease increases with age. Having a family history of the disease can increase a woman’s risk, and breastfeeding can reduce it.

All the different things that can increase the risk of breast cancer are held together by a common thread: they all affect the hormones circulating around in the body in some way.

Hormones help control what happens inside our bodies by sending messages from one place to another – including instructing cells when to stop and start multiplying.

If this system goes wrong, cells can get too many messages telling them to make more cells. And that can lead to cancer.

Overall the best advice is the same as at the start of the week: to keep active, keep a healthy weight throughout life, and limit alcohol.

Originally posted on CRUK, taken from Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute

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Research Assistant Position Availaible @ Institute for Social Marketing – University of Stirling

A vacancy has arisen for a Research Assistant to join the Institute for Social Marketing, part of the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, to work on a number of projects focusing on tackling alcohol-related harm. This is a fixed term position for a period of eight months. The post-holder will be based at the University of Stirling, but much of the work can be completed remotely by agreement.
jobThe postholder will assist in a Cancer Research UK funded project to assess the feasibility and value of a tool for analysing and monitoring politicians’ understanding of alcohol-related cancer-risks, alcohol problems and policy positions relating to alcohol. 
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Cancer Prevention Fellowship – CRUK

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This Fellowship funds outstanding postdoctoral researchers and health care professionals to research changes that can prevent people getting cancer.

Applications are considered on the basis of:

  • academic achievements to date and future potential,
  • scientific merit, novelty and potential for translation of the research proposal,
  • research environment provided by the sponsoring department.

Applicants should have:

  • at the time of submitting the application, between three and five years of research experience since completing a PhD (or equivalent higher research degree),
  • an excellent track record in previous postdoctoral position(s).

We expect successful Fellows to:

  • Engage with the overall Cancer Prevention Initiative, working alongside CRUK’s Policy Research Centre for Prevention, and/or involvement with the Innovation Fund scheme.
  • Have a clear training and development plan for the duration of the Fellowship, which demonstrates how skills and knowledge will have increased by the end of the Fellowship.
  • Have a clear plan as to how they will increase their collaborations and scientific networks – including outside of their immediate research field – over the course of the Fellowship. This may be through time spent working in other research groups, or remote collaboration.