Alcohol-related Hospital Admissions are at a Record High!

New figures released this week shows that hospital admissions due to alcohol are at their highest ever levels.

Capture14

The data, summarised in a release from NHS Digital, shows that alcohol-related hospital admissions in England have increased by 64% over the last decade, with an extra 430,000 people being admitted due to alcohol-related causes in 2015/16 compared with 2005/06.

This takes the total number of alcohol-related hospital admissions to over 1.1 million in 2015/16.

alcohol

Alcohol is linked to over 60 illnesses and diseases, including heart disease, liver disease and cancer. Figures from the local alcohol profiles for England show that admissions due to liver disease have gone up 57% over the last decade, and that the number of people diagnosed with alcohol-related cancer has increased 8%.

In contrast, separate data released today by the Office of National Statistics shows that the proportion of adults drinking is at its lowest level since 2005, with younger people more likely to be abstaining from alcohol. However, 7.8 million people admit to binge drinking on their heaviest drinking day.

In response to the figures, alcohol health experts called for more to be done in the UK to tackle the health harm done by alcohol.

Capture12.PNG

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA), said:

“These figures show that the UK continues to have a dysfunctional relationship with alcohol. We know that over the long term, rates of binge drinking are falling, and more people are choosing to abstain from alcohol. Worryingly, however, these trends do not appear big enough to stop alcohol harm from continuing to rise, and the sharp increase in alcohol-related hospital admissions over the last few years means hundreds of thousands more people each year are experiencing the misery associated with harmful alcohol consumption.

“The data released today should be sobering reading for whoever wins the upcoming general election, and we would urge the next government to make tackling alcohol harm an immediate priority to save lives, reduce harm, and reduce the pressure on the NHS.”

Capture13.PNG

 The data is available via the following links.

Over 200,000 children in England are living with Dependent Drinkers!

New figures released today reveal that over 200,000 children in England are living with dependent drinkers who could benefit from receiving specialist alcohol treatment.

The data from Public Health England estimates that there are 600,000 dependent drinkers who would benefit from treatment, yet only just over 100,000 are currently receiving the help they need.

These figures only cover adults who are most seriously dependent on alcohol. It is currently estimated that around 1.5 million adults in England and Wales have some form of alcohol dependence, and that there are 2.5 million children living with an adult drinking at risky levels.

The PHE data is released alongside a report from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) focused on improving the life chances and job prospects of the least well-off. The Department has said it will increase access to grant funding and introduce peer mentors for those in alcohol treatment to help them get back into work.

The report comes at a time when politicians are increasingly recognising the harm cheap alcohol is doing to the most vulnerable in society. The March budget included a consultation on the introduction of a new tax band designed to increase the price of strong white cider, a product which is predominantly consumed by children and heavy drinkers.

And earlier today a report published by the House of Lords Licensing Committee following an enquiry into the operation of the 2003 Licensing Act recognised the damage being done by cheap alcohol. The report calls for the introduction of a minimum unit price (MUP) for alcohol across the UK if it is introduced in Scotland and proves to be successful. Its introduction is being stalled by legal action being taken by sections of the alcohol industry. The report also calls for an end to multi-buy deals such as three for the price of two, a measure which has proved to be successful in Scotland.

Alcohol health experts welcomed the measures announced by the DWP today and the focus on the most vulnerable and lowest paid, pointing to studies which have shown that the least well off are around five times more likely to die from alcohol-related causes than those at the top of the income bracket.

Experts also called, however, for a wider, population-level approach to improving life and employment opportunities for dependent drinkers alongside greater support for individuals.

Liver physician Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA), said:

“We welcome the Government’s recognition that cheap alcohol is damaging some of the most vulnerable groups in society. The revelation that 200,000 children in England are living with adults in need of specialist help is deeply worrying. We need to make sure people get the support they need once they have a problem with alcohol, for their own sakes and for the sake of their children. But people don’t set out to become dependent drinkers and we need to stop more people from reaching that stage.

“For the greatest impact, the measures announced today should be combined with
measures like minimum unit pricing of alcohol. Studies have shown that setting a minimum price for alcohol would reduce unemployment and bring substantial numbers of unemployed drinkers back into the workforce.

“The government is already taking steps to tackle alcohol dependence in this broader way, with the recent announcement that it will be consulting on increasing the tax on high- strength ciders, drinks which are known to be drunk by the most vulnerable and do disproportionate harm.

“Studies also indicate that MUP would help address health inequalities, with over 80 per cent of lives saved coming from the lowest income groups. At the same time, the measure would not increase the price of alcohol sold in pubs and clubs.”

The Public Health England figures can be found here.
The DWP report, entitled Improving Lives: helping workless families, is available here.


About the Alcohol Health Alliance UK
The Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA) is a group of 50 organisations including the Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of GPs, British Medical Association, Alcohol Concern and the Institute of Alcohol Studies. The AHA works together to:
– Highlight the rising levels of alcohol-related health harm
– Propose evidence-based solutions to reduce this harm
– Influence decision makers to take positive action to address the damage caused by alcohol misuse

“Government has ‘no sense of direction’ in reducing devastating alcohol harm” | Lord Brooke

After Welfare, the cost of Health is the second biggest charge which Chancellors of the Exchequer have to deal with. Yet if one examines Budget speeches it rarely gets a mention, although in fairness to Phillip Hammond it did this year because of the crisis in Care which is directly linked to Health.

Health costs continue to grow at around 4% per annum but the economy is down around 2%. So with an aging population,the ‘health service car crash’ as one recent ex health service minister described it, every action must be taken or at least explored to avoid further injury or collapse.

That is what is at the heart of my debate – seeking changes that will reduce not only burgeoning public health costs but lead to healthier, happier and longer lives. As part of that, the Government must confront the stark challenge that alcohol abuse presents for the NHS in terms of financial costs, resources and impact on staff time and welfare.

Alcohol is estimated to cost the NHS around £3.5bn per year, which amounts to £120 for every taxpayer!

Even though drinking has declined marginally, there is a growing burden of alcohol related admissions and “activity” as our NHS tries to deal with the consequences of harmful drinking. This is not surprising when Public Health (England) recently reported:-

  • Alcohol is now the leading cause of death among 15 to 49 year olds.
  • There are now more than a million alcohol-related hospital admissions a year.
  • Alcohol caused more years of life lost to the workforce than from the 10 most cancers.
  • In England more than 10 million are drinking at levels that increase the risk of harming health.

There are 23,000 deaths related to alcohol in England each year, meaning that alcohol accounts for 10% of the UK burden of disease and death and is one of the three biggest avoidable risk factors of them.

Evidence indicates that the ease of access, availability and persistently cheap alcohol perpetuates these problems with deprivation and health inequalities particularly prevalent amongst men from lower socio-economic groups.

Alcohol is 60% more affordable today than it was in 1980. Affordability is one of the key drivers of consumption and harm: cheaper alcohol invariably leads to higher rates of death and disease.

David Cameron and the Coalition Government recognised this back in 2012 when they produced their progressive Alcohol Strategy. In its foreword he wrote”..and a real effort to get to grips with the root cause of the problem.That means coming down hard on cheap alcohol”

That hasn’t happened. Other aspects of the strategy have disappeared. There seems to be a vacuum with no discernible sense of direction. I will be pressing for one – the NHS certainly needs it.

download copy

 

Lord Brooke of Alverthorpe is a Labour peer in the House of Lords.

Original post here: Politics Home

Women & Alcohol | Edinburgh and London-Based Seminar Series | 2017

The Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) and the Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems (SHAAP) are co-hosting a four part seminar series to discuss issues relating to women and alcohol.

Each session will be chaired by an eminent academic, who will invite three guest speakers to present their personal responses to three pre-set questions, which are relevant to the topic.

These events will provide an opportunity for policy makers, academics, activists, and media representatives to critically discuss topics related to women and alcohol use. The intention is to stimulate thinking, challenge some attitudes and perceptions, and to think about future research and policy priorities.

Seminar 1: Friday, 10th March 2017

Women, Alcohol, and Globalisation.
Royal College of Physicians, London, 2 – 4pm

Chair: Dr. Cecile Knai, Associate Professor of Public Health Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  • How does alcohol marketing influence women’s behaviours?
  • How does alcohol marketing influence attitudes towards women?
  • How does alcohol affect women in different social and cultural contexts?

Continue reading

Kettil Bruun Society 43rd Annual Alcohol Symposium | Sheffield 5-9th June, 2017

The 43rd annual symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society is hosted by the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield. The symposium will be held in the Inox Dine area of the Student’s Union building.

For information about the Kettil Bruun Society, the Symposium, and to register, submit abstracts and book social tours, please click here.

To go straight to registration, please click here.

The conference is generously supported by the Insitute for Alcohol Studies, Alcohol Research UK, and the Society for the Study of Addiction.

The Kettil Bruun Society (KBS):

The principal aims of the Kettil Bruun Society (KBS) are to investigate social, epidemiological and cross-cultural research on alcohol use, to promote the exchange of scientific knowledge and experiences among researchers from various disciplines and to encourage international collaboration. The comparison of social and epidemiological developments found in different countries makes it possible to disentangle major trends from underlying patterns of alcohol use. This is particularly useful for the development of effective strategies to regulate alcohol use – an aspect which is of great interest to many countries.

The Symposium:

The primary purpose of the symposium is to provide a forum for researchers involved in studies on alcohol to exchange ideas about their ongoing research. The scope of the symposium includes studies of determinants and consequences of drinking, drinking culture and drinking patterns, social and institutional responses to drinking related harms, prevention and care. Empirical research, theoretical papers and reviews of the literature are welcome. Social and epidemiological studies have to be interpreted in a broad context as they include research in a variety of disciplines, such as psychology, sociology, criminology, economics, history and other sciences. Papers on other forms of substance use such as tobacco and drugs are also accepted, particularly papers considering the way they relate to alcohol use.

The symposium focuses on the discussion of papers that are pre-circulated electronically on this website. The author introduces the paper in a 10-minute segment, followed by prepared comments from a discussant and general audience participation. Any person submitting a paper may be asked to be a discussant or chair of a session.

Abstracts:

Please submit an abstract by 20 January 2017. The word limit for the abstract is 250 words and you should also include a conflict of interest statement and a maximum of three keywords (these are not included in the word count). For reports of empirical research, the abstract should be structured into sections: introduction, methods, results and conclusion.

All abstracts must include a conflict of interest statement. This should identify any author who has a relationship (financial or otherwise) which could be viewed as presenting a potential conflict of interest and give a full disclosure of this relationship.  If there are no conflicts of interest to report, please write ‘None’.

If you know in advance that you will only be able to attend the conference on certain days then please use the option in the submission form to indicate this and we will try to accommodate you when scheduling sessions.

 

Strong evidence that alcohol causes cancer, but how does the public interpret this information?

“Strong epidemiological evidence concerning the causal role of alcohol consumption in cancer may not fit easily with complex lay understandings of the causes of ill health”

Commentary to: Alcohol consumption as a cause of cancer

Connor [1] argues there is strong epidemiological evidence that alcohol causes cancer but highlights uncertainty about how this message may be understood by the ‘wider public’. We agree that there is public confusion and scepticism about public health advice on drinking, and that alcohol industry actors will seek to exploit this by ‘framing’ the debate in ways which further their commercial interests [2, 3]. However, there is also a pressing need to take into account the wider social context in which any new scientific evidence is introduced [4].

People have multi-factorial understandings of the causes of chronic disease which encompass family history, environmental factors, stress and luck, as well as behavioural factors such as smoking and drinking; these factors are perceived as interconnecting, rather than independent, and may become more or less salient at particular points in the life-course [5, 6]. Davison and colleagues [7, 8] argue that, in an iterative process similar to formal epidemiology, ‘lay’ epidemiologists extract information from mainstream health messages and observe patterns of illness and death among family, friends, acquaintances and those in public life to generate and reformulate hypotheses about ‘candidates’ for particular health problems. Gender, age and socio-economic status are also relevant here [9, 10]. Crucially, uncertainty is a key feature of lay epidemiology; some ‘candidates’ are observed to ‘do all the wrong things’ but live long lives (‘unwarranted survivals’: ‘the fat “Uncle Norman” figure who has survived into a healthy old age, despite extremely heavy smoking and drinking’) ([5], p. 682), while other people lead apparently ‘healthy’ lives but still suffer premature illness or death (‘anomalous deaths’). The ‘anomalous death’ of a relative is particularly important in undermining epidemiological evidence about risk factors for major diseases [11].

There are a number of reasons why the message ‘alcohol causes cancer’ may not fit easily with lay epidemiology. First, candidacy only indicates increased risk—not an inevitable outcome–so a message which emphasizes certainty rather than probability may be disregarded. Research investigating the acceptability of cancer warning messages among Australian drinkers [12] suggests that statements about alcohol leading to an ‘increased risk of cancer’ performed better than those which stated that alcohol ‘can cause cancer’.

Secondly, lay epidemiology encompasses an understanding of the different meaning of risk factors at the population and individual level: ‘most people have notions about what renders a person “a candidate” for a specific disease [incorporating “expert” epidemiological understandings of risk at the population level] whilst simultaneously understanding that life, health and death defy prediction at an individual level’ ([11], p. 445). Thus, simple health messages which focus exclusively upon behavioural risk factors at an individual level draw attention to ‘unwarranted survivals’ and particularly to ‘anomalous deaths’ in people’s social networks. The observation that behavioural change does not guarantee a reduction of risk at an individual level (mirroring epidemiological concerns about the ‘prevention paradox’) [11, 13] may therefore result in public scepticism.

Thirdly, while smokers are currently viewed as ‘candidates’ for cancer, it appears that drinkers are not; lay people struggle to find an explanation for non-smokers who develop cancer and instead emphasize the unpredictability and randomness of the disease [14]. Finally, it is important to explore how terms such ‘drinkers’ and ‘drinking’ might be interpreted by the wider public. While ‘smoking causes cancer’ draws on the commonly understood binary opposition between smokers and non-smokers, ‘drinking causes cancer’ may well be understood as comparing ‘heavy’ drinkers with ‘light’ or ‘moderate’ drinkers, rather than contrasting drinkers with non-drinkers. Qualitative research in the United Kingdom demonstrates that drinking is perceived as a routine activity associated with sociability, pleasure and relaxation and that heavy weekend drinking and drinking to intoxication are normalized; thus, drinking alone or choosing not to drink alcohol are behaviours which require explanation, not excessive drinking in general [13, 15-17]. In addition, people construct themselves as responsible, moderate drinkers and position other groups as the ‘problematic’ drinkers. For example, respondents in mid-life portray themselves as ‘experienced’ drinkers and younger people as irresponsible ‘problem’ drinkers [15], younger adults position older people, especially older women drinking heavily in public, as problematic [18], while younger middle-class women position working class women as vulgar and excessive drinkers [19]. This suggests that ‘drinking causes cancer’ may be interpreted as ‘other people’s excessive drinking causes cancer’.

Connor demonstrates the strength of the evidence for alcohol consumption as a cause of cancer. Further research on how lay people conceptualize drinkers and drinking when assessing candidacy is necessary before this message can be communicated effectively to the public.

Declaration of interests

C.E. is a member of the Alcohol Research UK Grants Advisory Panel and has received research funding from Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems. S.M. has no competing interests to declare.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Kate Hunt, Charlie Davison, Una Macleod and Graham Watt for previous conversations about lay epidemiology, and to Penny Buykx for useful suggestions for literature for this commentary.

Original post with references.

Alcohol consumption as a cause of cancer – Full Study

Reducing Alcohol Consumption: guidelines, local government and smartphone apps

An NIHR School for Public Health Research and UCL Centre for Behaviour Change event.

This event brought together researchers and practitioners in the field of excessive alcohol consumption reduction. Various speakers (from different institutions) discussed the latest research evidence and research evidence gaps. This was followed by a lively debate in the networking reception.

Available now are the presentations from the event and a summary of the social media coverage.

Speakers at the event:

  • Prof. Bernie Hannigan (PHE)
  • Dr John Holmes (ScHARR)
  • Prof. Matt Hickmann (University of Bristol)
  • Dr Jamie Brown (UCL)
  • Dr Gautam Mehta (UCLH)
  • Prof. Eileen Kaner (FUSE)

For more information on the event see the agenda & further information sheet.

Continue reading