A Stop Smoking in Schools Trial: A process evaluation of the implementation of ASSIST in Scotland

…this study has demonstrated that it is feasible and acceptable to deliver the ASSIST programme in Scottish schools,

University of Stirling, Health Sciences

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In 2014 the Institute for Social Marketing and a team of collaborators were appointed to conduct a process evaluation of ASSIST (A Stop Smoking in Schools Trial). ASSIST is a peer-led, school-based smoking prevention programme that encourages the dissemination of non-smoking norms by training students aged 12-14 to work as peer supporters. ASSIST was previously evaluated via a large cluster randomised trial of 59 schools in South Wales and Avon, England. Results from this trial showed that ASSIST was effective and cost effective at reducing smoking prevalence in young people (Campbell et al 2008), (Hollingworth et al 2012). This led to the wider roll out of ASSIST in parts of England and Wales and more recently in Scotland.

The overall aim of the study was to evaluate the process of implementing ASSIST in Scotland.

Three different delivery models were piloted in three NHS boards. This did not impact on fidelity…

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Burwalls Annual Meeting for Teachers of Medical Statistics | University of Nottingham | 26-28th June 2017

Booking is now open for the Burwalls 2017 meeting which is being held at the University of Nottingham’s beautiful University Park campus towards the west of the city.

It is a great opportunity to share and network with other teachers of medical statistics who teach undergraduate medical students and health professionals.

The conference will open on Monday 26 June at 12.30pm, and close at 12.30pm on Wednesday 28 June.

A Programme will be available in the next few weeks and booking and will remain open until Monday 15th May at 5pm.

Getting there: Nottingham is easily accessible by train and coach. Frequent trains run direct from London St. Pancreas, Leicester, Derby, Sheffield and Birmingham, with connections to the north of England and Scotland and the South West. More information on train times and routes, see www.nationalrail.co.uk

Coaches arrive and depart from Broadmarsh bus station in the centre of the city and there are regular services to London, Derby and other destinations.

Full details of travel to/around Nottingham can be found here.

Car Parking: Parking is free of charge for registered delegates who will be issued with a permit for the duration of the conference. Car parking requirements will be requested at the time of booking.

More information: If you have any questions or would like more information about the event, please contact either:

Matthew Grainge, Conference organiser and Associate Professor of Medical Statistics (matthew.grainge@nottingham.ac.uk)
Graeme Docherty, Research Coordinator (graeme.docherty@nottingham.ac.uk)

More information and how to book your place!

Cheap cider and an alcohol duty system that incentivises harmful practice

APE: Alcohol Policy and Epidemiology

Cheap alcohol and its association with harmful drinking have been at the centre of UK alcohol policy debate for almost a decade. Public health advocates have presented minimum unit pricing as a solution, but legal wrangles, political U-turns and the fine detail of devolution mean that the policy remains unimplemented in any UK country.

With their first choice policy on hold and a budget on the horizon, the Alcohol Health Alliance has, instead, turned its attention to taxation. The focus is on strong cider and the UK’s quirky system of alcohol duties which levies a uniquely low tax rate on some high strength ciders. This means that products such as Frosty Jack’s can be sold at budget prices. Indeed, you can help yourself to three litres of the stuff (equivalent to 24 shots of vodka or 22.5 units) from Iceland today for £3.50. These high strength, low cost ‘white…

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Report launch: New issues and age-old challenges: a review of young people’s relationship with tobacco | 27/02/17

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Join Prof Amanda Amos and Prof Marcus Munafo to discuss the current landscape, challenges and opportunities including a focus on young people, tobacco and mental health.

Please book your free please here>

The face of youth smoking in the UK is evolving.  Young people are growing up in a society radically disrupted by new technologies and societal norms, which are reshaping their perceptions of personal health, image, and values.

New issues and age-old challenges: a review of young people’s relationship with tobacco, brings together the available evidence on youth smoking and articulates a clear demand for action across the system.

Martin Dockrell from Public Health England will chair the panel session.

Full agenda is available here>

Thinking about Drinking: A Year in the Life of an Alcohol Researcher at Stirling

Niamh was active in helping the media understand the implications of theniamhfitzgerald 2016 new alcohol guidelines. In this blog post she discusses what happened as a result of the publication of the new guidelines and how the media portray the facts in their own way.

By Niamh Fitzgerald, Research Profile, @NiamhCreate

Journalists love a good alcohol story, especially at this time of year, and January 2016 gave them the ideal ammunition with the publication of new advice from the UK’s Chief Medical Officers (CMOs) designed to provide people with ‘accurate information and clear advice about alcohol and its health risks’.  For the first time, the guidance advised that ‘no level of regular drinking can be considered completely safe’ and advised the same limit for both men and women – not to regularly drink above 14 units of alcohol (about 1 and a half bottles of wine) per week, at the same time moving away from the previous daily limits.  The guidance was based on a lengthy process involving experts from around the UK including Prof. Gerard Hastings (from Stirling) and followed emerging evidence on the links between alcohol and cancer – kicking off a furore of media coverage.

Media coverage following the publication of the new guidelines

The Daily Mail led with the news that the guidelines would ‘put a stop to the belief that red wine is good for you in moderation, while the Sun also focused on this ‘plonk lovers’ shock’ as the CMO’s ‘rubbished’ the supposed health benefits of wine.

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Others focused on the cancer risk, with the Scotsman leading with ‘drinkers at risk of cancer from single glass of wine’; whereas the Telegraph headline was ‘health chiefs attacked for nanny state alcohol guidelines’.  It was a frantic week for colleagues and I at the Institute for Social Marketing (ISM) as we sought to capture all of the newspaper, television and radio coverage for future analysis.  As Lecturer in Alcohol Studies at ISM, and lead for teaching and public engagement on alcohol for the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS), I was interviewed about the new guidelines on BBC News for their ‘Ask This’ feature, which takes questions from viewers.  I also had a comment piece published in The Scotsman. Continue reading

#WorldNoTobaccoDay: Linda Bauld and the road to standardised tobacco packaging @bmj_latest

“The road to standardised tobacco packaging in the UK”

Every year in the United Kingdom around 200 000 children start smoking. Half of those who try a cigarette will become regular smokers, putting themselves at risk of tobacco related diseases that can shorten their lifespan by at least a decade. Because of this, the UK and other governments have implemented a range of tobacco control measures over many years, which are intended to both prevent smoking uptake and encourage smoking cessation. Key among these have been measures to restrict the ability of the tobacco industry to market their products to new and existing smokers.

Firstly, traditional forms of advertising such as TV and billboards were banned, followed by sports sponsorship, and, most recently, point of sale displays in shops. All that was left was tobacco packaging: a way to communicate to consumers the appeal of the product and to promote different brands.

My team at the University of Stirling has conducted research on tobacco marketing for many years, funded by Cancer Research UK. Most recently we undertook our own studies on tobacco packaging, and then in 2011 were commissioned by the Department of Health to review all the evidence on plain or “standard packs.” Our review provided the basis for a UK consultation on the issue. At the time we found 37 studies, conducted in different countries and using a variety of research designs. Their findings were consistent. The studies showed that standard packs are: less appealing, increase the visibility and effectiveness of health warnings, and reduce the ability of packaging to mislead people about the harms of smoking.


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