UKCTAS Air Quality Report used to support the move to #Smokefree Prisons in 2016

Leah Jayes, University of Nottingham:

Our findings provide strong evidence that smoking in prisons in England is a source of high second-hand smoke exposure for staff members and prisoners. We are pleased that these findings have been instrumental in the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) decision to start their smoke-free roll out throughout prisons in England and Wales from next month. The harms of second-hand smoke are well established, this move will improve the health and well-being of those who live and work in prisons in England and Wales.

It is estimated that around 80% of the prison population smoke and we appreciate that this is the start of a long journey towards a completely smoke-free prison estate in the UK. However, we know that Young Offender Institutes and Mental Health Units in England, and prisons in other countries with similar penal systems have all implemented similar smoke-free policy and it often soon becomes the norm.

UKCTAS will continue our collaborative work with NOMS and work closely with the four pilot prisons in the South-West to evaluate their move towards becoming smoke-free in 2016. NOMS have outlined a phased approach for all remaining prisons in England to go smoke-free in the future.

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