UKCTAS comment on the latest tobacco control plan for England: “Towards a smoke-free generation”

The new tobacco control plan, ‘Towards a smoke free generation’ is a welcome restatement of the government’s commitment to reduce the prevalence, and hence the burden of death and disability caused, by smoking. The recognition that harm reduction strategies can play a key role in achieving these ambitions is applauded, and puts the UK at the forefront of global tobacco policy. However, the ambition to reduce adult smoking in England from 15.5% to 12% by 2022, representing as it does a reduction of 0.5 of a percentage point per year, is modest given that smoking prevalence has fallen by 2.9 percentage points in the last three years.

Recognising reducing smoking in pregnancy as a priority, and aiming to reduce prevalence in pregnancy to 6% or less, is welcome but will not be achieved without adequate resources, improved care pathways and addressing significant gaps in training for midwives and obstetricians. The commitment to make NHS inpatient mental health settings smoke-free by 2018 is long overdue, but it is disappointing that the same strong commitment is not extended to other NHS settings.

The ambition to make stop-smoking services more available is also welcome, but like the commitments to NHS settings and for pregnancy requires funding: when public health budgets are being slashed, how will local authorities afford to increase their smoking service provision?

What matters now is delivery: Action to achieve and exceed these ambitions is the next and crucial step

PDF of the Press Release

UKCTAS Air Quality Report used to support the move to #Smokefree Prisons in 2016

Leah Jayes, University of Nottingham:

Our findings provide strong evidence that smoking in prisons in England is a source of high second-hand smoke exposure for staff members and prisoners. We are pleased that these findings have been instrumental in the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) decision to start their smoke-free roll out throughout prisons in England and Wales from next month. The harms of second-hand smoke are well established, this move will improve the health and well-being of those who live and work in prisons in England and Wales.

It is estimated that around 80% of the prison population smoke and we appreciate that this is the start of a long journey towards a completely smoke-free prison estate in the UK. However, we know that Young Offender Institutes and Mental Health Units in England, and prisons in other countries with similar penal systems have all implemented similar smoke-free policy and it often soon becomes the norm.

UKCTAS will continue our collaborative work with NOMS and work closely with the four pilot prisons in the South-West to evaluate their move towards becoming smoke-free in 2016. NOMS have outlined a phased approach for all remaining prisons in England to go smoke-free in the future.

Continue reading