Alcohol-related Hospital Admissions are at a Record High!

New figures released this week shows that hospital admissions due to alcohol are at their highest ever levels.

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The data, summarised in a release from NHS Digital, shows that alcohol-related hospital admissions in England have increased by 64% over the last decade, with an extra 430,000 people being admitted due to alcohol-related causes in 2015/16 compared with 2005/06.

This takes the total number of alcohol-related hospital admissions to over 1.1 million in 2015/16.

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Alcohol is linked to over 60 illnesses and diseases, including heart disease, liver disease and cancer. Figures from the local alcohol profiles for England show that admissions due to liver disease have gone up 57% over the last decade, and that the number of people diagnosed with alcohol-related cancer has increased 8%.

In contrast, separate data released today by the Office of National Statistics shows that the proportion of adults drinking is at its lowest level since 2005, with younger people more likely to be abstaining from alcohol. However, 7.8 million people admit to binge drinking on their heaviest drinking day.

In response to the figures, alcohol health experts called for more to be done in the UK to tackle the health harm done by alcohol.

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Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA), said:

“These figures show that the UK continues to have a dysfunctional relationship with alcohol. We know that over the long term, rates of binge drinking are falling, and more people are choosing to abstain from alcohol. Worryingly, however, these trends do not appear big enough to stop alcohol harm from continuing to rise, and the sharp increase in alcohol-related hospital admissions over the last few years means hundreds of thousands more people each year are experiencing the misery associated with harmful alcohol consumption.

“The data released today should be sobering reading for whoever wins the upcoming general election, and we would urge the next government to make tackling alcohol harm an immediate priority to save lives, reduce harm, and reduce the pressure on the NHS.”

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 The data is available via the following links.

Tobacco Control in England: Reducing Inequalities and Improving NHS Sustainability

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Public Health England and NHS England are hosting three one-day events with a practical focus on the current challenges and how they can be met, discussing implementation of tobacco control interventions and how the NHS can make its contribution, to the benefit not only of millions of smokers but its own sustainability.

London – Tuesday 4 April

Leeds – Wednesday 26 April

Birmingham – Thursday 4 May

Smoking rates in England have been declining steadily in the general adult population in recent years (17%), falling further and faster among young people (8%). However, hidden behind this success is slower progress among certain population groups, including individuals with mental health problems and those on lower incomes. Large geographical variations also remain, including amongst women who smoke during pregnancy.

Smokers from all groups are likely to be high users of healthcare services, with significant financial and capacity related implications. Addressing this will be key to ensuring NHS sustainability.

Reducing smoking is key to ensuring NHS sustainability and with the new national CQUIN for addressing risky behaviours (alcohol and tobacco) and local Sustainability and Transformation Plans, there is a fresh impetus for collective action to reduce the health inequalities caused by smoking.

Aim:

  • to explore opportunities for action across the local system to engage with smokers and support them to quit, tackling health inequalities and reducing the burden on the NHS and social care of smoking-related disease.

Objectives:

  • identify key areas for joint action to tackle smoking and reduce health inequalities
  • understand where smokers are accessing the healthcare system and how this impacts on primary and secondary care services
  • consider the ways in which healthcare professionals can integrate treatment for tobacco dependence into routine care and support smokers to quit

Who should attend?

  • local authority and NHS commissioners
  • CCG leads for acute care, mental health and maternity
  • healthcare and service providers
  • those with responsibility for managing: Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUINS), delivery of Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs), implementation of the stillbirth reduction care bundle
  • regional strategic leads for health improvement and clinical networks

More information and registration!