New evidence finds standardised cigarette packaging may reduce the number of people who smoke as UK legislation bans the use of branding on all cigarette packets from May 2017.

A Cochrane Review published today finds standardised tobacco packaging may lead to a reduction in smoking prevalence and reduces the appeal of tobacco.

According to the World Health Organisation, tobacco use kills more people worldwide than any other preventable cause of death. Global health experts believe the best way to reduce tobacco use is by stopping people starting to use tobacco and encouraging and helping existing users to stop.

plain-packs-620-x-348-heroThe introduction of standardised (or ‘plain’) packaging was recommended by the World Health Organisation, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) guidelines. This recommendation was based on evidence around tobacco promotion in general and studies which examined the impact of changes in packaging on knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviour. Standardised tobacco packaging places restrictions on the appearance of tobacco packs so that there is a uniform colour (and in some cases shape) with no logos or branding apart from health warnings and other government-mandated information, and the brand name appears in a prescribed uniform font, colour and size.

From next month, UK legislation on standardised packaging for all tobacco packs comes into full effect.

Australia was the first country in the world to implement standardised packaging of tobacco products.  The laws, which took full effect there in December 2012, also required enlarged pictorial health warnings.

A team of Cochrane researchers from the UK and Canada have summarised results from studies that examine the impact of standardised packaging on tobacco attitudes and behaviour. They have today published their findings in the Cochrane Library.

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Dr Jo Cranwell discusses alcohol content & advertising in the media at a meeting of the European Parliament | University of Bath

Dr Jo Cranwell, Assistant Professor in Public Health at the University of Bath and UKCTAS research fellow delivered the keynote presentation at a meeting of the European Parliament held to discuss the revision of the Audio Visual Media Services Directive. (The EU’s Audiovisual Media Services Directive governs EU-wide coordination of national legislation on all audiovisual media, both traditional TV broadcasts and on-demand services.)

Jo was invited as a keynote speaker to discuss the work conducted by researchers at the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies on alcohol content and advertising in traditional and digital media.

Here are a few pictures from the meeting:

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To see more about tobacco and alcohol content in the media click here!

UKCTAS Air Quality Report used to support the move to #Smokefree Prisons in 2016

Leah Jayes, University of Nottingham:

Our findings provide strong evidence that smoking in prisons in England is a source of high second-hand smoke exposure for staff members and prisoners. We are pleased that these findings have been instrumental in the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) decision to start their smoke-free roll out throughout prisons in England and Wales from next month. The harms of second-hand smoke are well established, this move will improve the health and well-being of those who live and work in prisons in England and Wales.

It is estimated that around 80% of the prison population smoke and we appreciate that this is the start of a long journey towards a completely smoke-free prison estate in the UK. However, we know that Young Offender Institutes and Mental Health Units in England, and prisons in other countries with similar penal systems have all implemented similar smoke-free policy and it often soon becomes the norm.

UKCTAS will continue our collaborative work with NOMS and work closely with the four pilot prisons in the South-West to evaluate their move towards becoming smoke-free in 2016. NOMS have outlined a phased approach for all remaining prisons in England to go smoke-free in the future.

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