Participants needed: A pilot study into the determinants of behaviour change in alcohol use disorder.

Queen Mary University is looking for people with problematic drinking who are currently trying to stop drinking, but unable to do so.

A pilot study into the determinants of behaviour change in alcohol use disorder.

We would like to invite you to be part of this research project.  It is entirely up to you if you want to take part. If you choose not to take part there won’t be any disadvantages for you and you will hear no more about it.

Please read the following information; this will tell you why the research is being done and what you will be asked to do. Please ask if anything is not clear or you would like more information.

The Study.

Achieving and maintaining abstinence from alcohol can be difficult. Scientific study into the reasons behind these difficulties has identified a number of factors which may play a role in the inability to stop drinking. This project examines several of these to further clarify their role.

Why have I been invited to take part?

We are looking for two groups of people. Those who have successfully managed to stop drinking for 12 months or more, and those who cannot maintain abstinence for more than 30 days, despite a desire to stop.

What will happen if I take part?

If you wish to participate we will arrange an appointment that will take about 1-1.5 hours. This will consist of a series of questionnaires and behavioural tasks including holding your breath for as long as you can; a hand grip task; and a computer task where you will trace the outline of a shape. You will receive £10 to put towards any travel costs you may incur.

If you live outside of London you will be able to complete the study remotely and will receive payment by mail.

The session will be conducted by PhD student Daisy Thompson-Lake who is under the supervision of Professor Peter Hajek and Professor De La Garza.

If you agree to give contact details we will also contact you in the future to ask you for your breath holding time via email or telephone. This is not compulsory and you will receive the compensation should you decide to give no contact details.

What are the risks of taking part?

There are no risks associated with taking part in the study.

What are the benefits of taking part?

There are no direct benefits to you for taking part. However, the information you provide may contribute towards better understanding of factors contributing to stopping drinking, and future treatments.

Will my data be kept confidential?

Yes, if you agree to take part all information you give us will be kept confidential and only study staff will have access to this data. All data will be anonymised and there will be no information included in the study which could identify you.

What if I want to leave the study?

Your participation is entirely voluntary, and you are free to leave the study at any time for any reason. We will request your permission to keep the information you have given us until the time you decide to leave the study.

What happens if you are concerned or have any questions?

You will be able to contact Daisy Thompson-Lake (02078828244, d.g.y.thompson-lake@qmul.ac.uk ) if you are worried about anything or have any questions.

The Chief Investigator of this study is Professor Peter Hajek, Tobacco Dependence Research Unit, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, 2 Stayner’s Road, Stepney Green, E1 4AH, Email: p.hajek@qmul.ac.uk Tel:  020 7882 8230.

A summary of the report from this study will be available upon request.

We would like to thank you for your interest in this study.

 

If interested please call or email Daisy on :

02078828244 or d.g.y.thompson-lake@qmul.ac.uk

Thinking about Drinking: A Year in the Life of an Alcohol Researcher at Stirling

Niamh was active in helping the media understand the implications of theniamhfitzgerald 2016 new alcohol guidelines. In this blog post she discusses what happened as a result of the publication of the new guidelines and how the media portray the facts in their own way.

By Niamh Fitzgerald, Research Profile, @NiamhCreate

Journalists love a good alcohol story, especially at this time of year, and January 2016 gave them the ideal ammunition with the publication of new advice from the UK’s Chief Medical Officers (CMOs) designed to provide people with ‘accurate information and clear advice about alcohol and its health risks’.  For the first time, the guidance advised that ‘no level of regular drinking can be considered completely safe’ and advised the same limit for both men and women – not to regularly drink above 14 units of alcohol (about 1 and a half bottles of wine) per week, at the same time moving away from the previous daily limits.  The guidance was based on a lengthy process involving experts from around the UK including Prof. Gerard Hastings (from Stirling) and followed emerging evidence on the links between alcohol and cancer – kicking off a furore of media coverage.

Media coverage following the publication of the new guidelines

The Daily Mail led with the news that the guidelines would ‘put a stop to the belief that red wine is good for you in moderation, while the Sun also focused on this ‘plonk lovers’ shock’ as the CMO’s ‘rubbished’ the supposed health benefits of wine.

alcohol-daily-mail

Others focused on the cancer risk, with the Scotsman leading with ‘drinkers at risk of cancer from single glass of wine’; whereas the Telegraph headline was ‘health chiefs attacked for nanny state alcohol guidelines’.  It was a frantic week for colleagues and I at the Institute for Social Marketing (ISM) as we sought to capture all of the newspaper, television and radio coverage for future analysis.  As Lecturer in Alcohol Studies at ISM, and lead for teaching and public engagement on alcohol for the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS), I was interviewed about the new guidelines on BBC News for their ‘Ask This’ feature, which takes questions from viewers.  I also had a comment piece published in The Scotsman. Continue reading

Reducing Alcohol Consumption: guidelines, local government and smartphone apps

An NIHR School for Public Health Research and UCL Centre for Behaviour Change event.

This event brought together researchers and practitioners in the field of excessive alcohol consumption reduction. Various speakers (from different institutions) discussed the latest research evidence and research evidence gaps. This was followed by a lively debate in the networking reception.

Available now are the presentations from the event and a summary of the social media coverage.

Speakers at the event:

  • Prof. Bernie Hannigan (PHE)
  • Dr John Holmes (ScHARR)
  • Prof. Matt Hickmann (University of Bristol)
  • Dr Jamie Brown (UCL)
  • Dr Gautam Mehta (UCLH)
  • Prof. Eileen Kaner (FUSE)

For more information on the event see the agenda & further information sheet.

Continue reading

Smartphone application could help people cut down their alcohol consumption – University College London

Susan Michie, Professor of Health Psychology and her team at UCL, have developed a new type of app to tackle excessive alcohol consumption, a major societal and public health challenge.

This is the first app that uses evidence and theory from the fields of behavioural science and addiction to help support users in reducing their alcohol consumption.

appalcohol

Drink Less is a super-easy to use app that allows you to keep track of how much you drink, set goals to drink less, get feedback on whether what you’re doing is working and access some unique and fun ways of changing your attitude towards alcohol. Try it here!

 

You can:
– Keep track of your drinking and see how it changes over time
– Set goals for the targets that matter to you and get feedback on your progress towards them
– Complete a daily mood diary so you can better understand the effects of your hangover
– Play games designed to strengthen your resolve to drink less alcohol
– Create plans for dealing with situations when you may be tempted to drink excessively
– Take part in exercises designed to change your relationship with alcohol

Drink Less has been created by a team of psychologists at University College London; who’re researching what techniques help people reduce their consumption of alcohol. You can use the app fully without taking part in the study and you can opt-out of it at any time. But if you do participate you’ll be helping understand how to help more people drink less.

DrinkLessAlcohol.com

 

 

 

Prescribed alcohol drug ‘Nalmefene’ was licensed despite insufficient evidence to prove its effectiveness

A study from the University of Stirling’s Institute of Social Marketing showed that a drug being used to treat alcohol problems in the UK was licensed for use, despite insufficient evidence to prove its effectiveness.

The drug nalmefene, marketed as Selincro®, was approved in Europe in February 2013 and was subsequently recommended by the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

Yet a team of scientists have found problems with the way clinical trials were conducted and analysed, making it impossible to know how much the drug actually helps to reduce drinking in patients dependent on alcohol.

Outlined in the journal Addiction, a group of experts analysed the published studies of nalmefene that formed the basis for the licensing and NICE decision. They concluded that evidence of its effectiveness was weak, and any possible effect on patients was small at around a one drink per day reduction on average. Continue reading

Dr Niamh Fitzgerald – Conversations about alcohol: making a difference to alcohol-related harm

The Evidence Exchange programme, an Alliance for Useful Evidence initiative, seeks to encourage the sharing and use of social policy evidence across the UK.

In this episode, Niamh discusses what is known about ABIs, how and where they work; her recent research on delivery of ABIs outside of primary healthcare, and pointers for practitioners.

One of the programme’s themes is the role of evidence in developing policy and interventions that reduce people’s risk of alcohol related harm, such as ABIs – Alcohol Brief Interventions. Dr Niamh Fitzgerald is an experienced ABI researcher and trainer across the UK. She works at the University of Stirling, developing alcohol teaching and public involvement for the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies.

There will be more discussion on this topic in a webinar on 26 May 2015, including learning from practice in Wales and England. Dr. Niamh Fitzgerald will also participate in the webinar.

For more from Iris FM click here.