Over 200,000 children in England are living with Dependent Drinkers!

New figures released today reveal that over 200,000 children in England are living with dependent drinkers who could benefit from receiving specialist alcohol treatment.

The data from Public Health England estimates that there are 600,000 dependent drinkers who would benefit from treatment, yet only just over 100,000 are currently receiving the help they need.

These figures only cover adults who are most seriously dependent on alcohol. It is currently estimated that around 1.5 million adults in England and Wales have some form of alcohol dependence, and that there are 2.5 million children living with an adult drinking at risky levels.

The PHE data is released alongside a report from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) focused on improving the life chances and job prospects of the least well-off. The Department has said it will increase access to grant funding and introduce peer mentors for those in alcohol treatment to help them get back into work.

The report comes at a time when politicians are increasingly recognising the harm cheap alcohol is doing to the most vulnerable in society. The March budget included a consultation on the introduction of a new tax band designed to increase the price of strong white cider, a product which is predominantly consumed by children and heavy drinkers.

And earlier today a report published by the House of Lords Licensing Committee following an enquiry into the operation of the 2003 Licensing Act recognised the damage being done by cheap alcohol. The report calls for the introduction of a minimum unit price (MUP) for alcohol across the UK if it is introduced in Scotland and proves to be successful. Its introduction is being stalled by legal action being taken by sections of the alcohol industry. The report also calls for an end to multi-buy deals such as three for the price of two, a measure which has proved to be successful in Scotland.

Alcohol health experts welcomed the measures announced by the DWP today and the focus on the most vulnerable and lowest paid, pointing to studies which have shown that the least well off are around five times more likely to die from alcohol-related causes than those at the top of the income bracket.

Experts also called, however, for a wider, population-level approach to improving life and employment opportunities for dependent drinkers alongside greater support for individuals.

Liver physician Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA), said:

“We welcome the Government’s recognition that cheap alcohol is damaging some of the most vulnerable groups in society. The revelation that 200,000 children in England are living with adults in need of specialist help is deeply worrying. We need to make sure people get the support they need once they have a problem with alcohol, for their own sakes and for the sake of their children. But people don’t set out to become dependent drinkers and we need to stop more people from reaching that stage.

“For the greatest impact, the measures announced today should be combined with
measures like minimum unit pricing of alcohol. Studies have shown that setting a minimum price for alcohol would reduce unemployment and bring substantial numbers of unemployed drinkers back into the workforce.

“The government is already taking steps to tackle alcohol dependence in this broader way, with the recent announcement that it will be consulting on increasing the tax on high- strength ciders, drinks which are known to be drunk by the most vulnerable and do disproportionate harm.

“Studies also indicate that MUP would help address health inequalities, with over 80 per cent of lives saved coming from the lowest income groups. At the same time, the measure would not increase the price of alcohol sold in pubs and clubs.”

The Public Health England figures can be found here.
The DWP report, entitled Improving Lives: helping workless families, is available here.


About the Alcohol Health Alliance UK
The Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA) is a group of 50 organisations including the Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of GPs, British Medical Association, Alcohol Concern and the Institute of Alcohol Studies. The AHA works together to:
– Highlight the rising levels of alcohol-related health harm
– Propose evidence-based solutions to reduce this harm
– Influence decision makers to take positive action to address the damage caused by alcohol misuse

“Government has ‘no sense of direction’ in reducing devastating alcohol harm” | Lord Brooke

After Welfare, the cost of Health is the second biggest charge which Chancellors of the Exchequer have to deal with. Yet if one examines Budget speeches it rarely gets a mention, although in fairness to Phillip Hammond it did this year because of the crisis in Care which is directly linked to Health.

Health costs continue to grow at around 4% per annum but the economy is down around 2%. So with an aging population,the ‘health service car crash’ as one recent ex health service minister described it, every action must be taken or at least explored to avoid further injury or collapse.

That is what is at the heart of my debate – seeking changes that will reduce not only burgeoning public health costs but lead to healthier, happier and longer lives. As part of that, the Government must confront the stark challenge that alcohol abuse presents for the NHS in terms of financial costs, resources and impact on staff time and welfare.

Alcohol is estimated to cost the NHS around £3.5bn per year, which amounts to £120 for every taxpayer!

Even though drinking has declined marginally, there is a growing burden of alcohol related admissions and “activity” as our NHS tries to deal with the consequences of harmful drinking. This is not surprising when Public Health (England) recently reported:-

  • Alcohol is now the leading cause of death among 15 to 49 year olds.
  • There are now more than a million alcohol-related hospital admissions a year.
  • Alcohol caused more years of life lost to the workforce than from the 10 most cancers.
  • In England more than 10 million are drinking at levels that increase the risk of harming health.

There are 23,000 deaths related to alcohol in England each year, meaning that alcohol accounts for 10% of the UK burden of disease and death and is one of the three biggest avoidable risk factors of them.

Evidence indicates that the ease of access, availability and persistently cheap alcohol perpetuates these problems with deprivation and health inequalities particularly prevalent amongst men from lower socio-economic groups.

Alcohol is 60% more affordable today than it was in 1980. Affordability is one of the key drivers of consumption and harm: cheaper alcohol invariably leads to higher rates of death and disease.

David Cameron and the Coalition Government recognised this back in 2012 when they produced their progressive Alcohol Strategy. In its foreword he wrote”..and a real effort to get to grips with the root cause of the problem.That means coming down hard on cheap alcohol”

That hasn’t happened. Other aspects of the strategy have disappeared. There seems to be a vacuum with no discernible sense of direction. I will be pressing for one – the NHS certainly needs it.

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Lord Brooke of Alverthorpe is a Labour peer in the House of Lords.

Original post here: Politics Home

Women & Alcohol | Edinburgh and London-Based Seminar Series | 2017

The Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) and the Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems (SHAAP) are co-hosting a four part seminar series to discuss issues relating to women and alcohol.

Each session will be chaired by an eminent academic, who will invite three guest speakers to present their personal responses to three pre-set questions, which are relevant to the topic.

These events will provide an opportunity for policy makers, academics, activists, and media representatives to critically discuss topics related to women and alcohol use. The intention is to stimulate thinking, challenge some attitudes and perceptions, and to think about future research and policy priorities.

Seminar 1: Friday, 10th March 2017

Women, Alcohol, and Globalisation.
Royal College of Physicians, London, 2 – 4pm

Chair: Dr. Cecile Knai, Associate Professor of Public Health Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  • How does alcohol marketing influence women’s behaviours?
  • How does alcohol marketing influence attitudes towards women?
  • How does alcohol affect women in different social and cultural contexts?

Continue reading

Healthier central England or North–South divide? Analysis of national survey data on smoking and high-risk drinking

In England, around 20% of the population are smokers and 13% drink excessively. These behaviours are leading risk factors for several non-communicable diseases, including cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory and cardiovascular conditions. It is estimated that around 8000 deaths/year are alcohol-related and 80 000 deaths of adults aged 35 and over are attributed to smoking annually. The prevalence and adverse effects of high-risk drinking and tobacco use are not equally distributed across the country, with large regional variations.

A North–South divide exists for smoking, with higher rates of tobacco use, smoking-related deaths and smoking-related harm in northern regions. 

In contrast, excessive alcohol consumption tends to be lowest in central and eastern regions, while an East versus West divide is seen in the prevalence of alcohol dependency and alcohol sales. These regional variations in consumption do not always map onto experienced harm, a phenomenon known as the Alcohol Harm Paradox. In 2014, alcohol-related death rates were significantly higher among regions in the north of England compared with those in the south.

Objectives: This paper compares patterns of smoking and high-risk alcohol use across regions in England, and assesses the impact on these of adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics.

Design: Population survey of 53 922 adults in England aged 16+ taking part in the Alcohol and Smoking Toolkit Studies.

Measures: Participants answered questions regarding their socioeconomic status (SES), gender, age, ethnicity, Government Office Region, smoking status and completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). High-risk drinkers were defined as those with a score of 8 or more (7 or more for women) on the AUDIT.

Results: In unadjusted analyses, relative to the South West, those in the North of England were more likely to smoke, while those from the East of England, South East and London were less likely. After adjustment for sociodemographics, smoking prevalence was no higher in North East (RR 0.97, p>0.05), North West (RR 0.98, p>0.05) or Yorkshire and the Humber (RR 1.03, p>0.05) but was less common in the East and West Midlands (RR 0.86, p<0.001; RR 0.91, p<0.05), East of England (RR 0.86, p<0.001), South East (RR 0.92, p<0.05) and London (RR 0.85, p<0.001). High-risk drinking was more common in the North but was less common in the Midlands, London and East of England. Adjustment for sociodemographics had little effect. There was a higher prevalence in the North East (RR 1.67, p<0.001), North West (RR 1.42, p<0.001) and Yorkshire and the Humber (RR 1.35, p<0.001); lower prevalence in the East Midlands (RR 0.69, p<0.001), West Midlands (RR 0.77, p<0.001), East of England (RR 0.72, p<0.001) and London (RR 0.71, p<0.001); and a similar prevalence in the South East (RR 1.10, p>0.05)

Figure 2Figure 2: Association between Government Office Region and high-risk drinking: (A) unadjusted;
(B) adjusted for gender, age, ethnicity and socioeconomic status (reference region: South West). Note: this shows the relative risk difference for each region relative to the South West (dotted reference region). Increasing red tones reflect increasingly higher significant risk and increasing blue tones reflect increasingly lower significant risk. Regions shaded white have a similar risk to the South West. Online supplementary figure S9 labels the Government Office Regions in England.
Expand Image – More diagrams in the main report

Conclusions: In adjusted analyses, smoking and high-risk drinking appear less common in ‘central England’ than in the rest of the country. Regional differences in smoking, but not those in high-risk drinking, appear to be explained to some extent by sociodemographic disparities.

Strengths and limitations of this study

  • Used a representative survey about smoking and drinking conducted on a large sample of the adult population in England.

  • Based on the most up-to-date information in England on regional differences in smoking and high-risk drinking accounting for disparities in gender, socioeconomic status (SES), ethnicity and age.

  • Respondents may have underestimated or failed to report their drinking and smoking.

  • Patterns of smoking and alcohol use were only available at the Government Office Region level, whereas important variation may occur at a more micro-geographical level.

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Copyright information:
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited.

 

Read the full report here!

Participants needed: A pilot study into the determinants of behaviour change in alcohol use disorder.

Queen Mary University is looking for people with problematic drinking who are currently trying to stop drinking, but unable to do so.

A pilot study into the determinants of behaviour change in alcohol use disorder.

We would like to invite you to be part of this research project.  It is entirely up to you if you want to take part. If you choose not to take part there won’t be any disadvantages for you and you will hear no more about it.

Please read the following information; this will tell you why the research is being done and what you will be asked to do. Please ask if anything is not clear or you would like more information.

The Study.

Achieving and maintaining abstinence from alcohol can be difficult. Scientific study into the reasons behind these difficulties has identified a number of factors which may play a role in the inability to stop drinking. This project examines several of these to further clarify their role.

Why have I been invited to take part?

We are looking for two groups of people. Those who have successfully managed to stop drinking for 12 months or more, and those who cannot maintain abstinence for more than 30 days, despite a desire to stop.

What will happen if I take part?

If you wish to participate we will arrange an appointment that will take about 1-1.5 hours. This will consist of a series of questionnaires and behavioural tasks including holding your breath for as long as you can; a hand grip task; and a computer task where you will trace the outline of a shape. You will receive £10 to put towards any travel costs you may incur.

If you live outside of London you will be able to complete the study remotely and will receive payment by mail.

The session will be conducted by PhD student Daisy Thompson-Lake who is under the supervision of Professor Peter Hajek and Professor De La Garza.

If you agree to give contact details we will also contact you in the future to ask you for your breath holding time via email or telephone. This is not compulsory and you will receive the compensation should you decide to give no contact details.

What are the risks of taking part?

There are no risks associated with taking part in the study.

What are the benefits of taking part?

There are no direct benefits to you for taking part. However, the information you provide may contribute towards better understanding of factors contributing to stopping drinking, and future treatments.

Will my data be kept confidential?

Yes, if you agree to take part all information you give us will be kept confidential and only study staff will have access to this data. All data will be anonymised and there will be no information included in the study which could identify you.

What if I want to leave the study?

Your participation is entirely voluntary, and you are free to leave the study at any time for any reason. We will request your permission to keep the information you have given us until the time you decide to leave the study.

What happens if you are concerned or have any questions?

You will be able to contact Daisy Thompson-Lake (02078828244, d.g.y.thompson-lake@qmul.ac.uk ) if you are worried about anything or have any questions.

The Chief Investigator of this study is Professor Peter Hajek, Tobacco Dependence Research Unit, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, 2 Stayner’s Road, Stepney Green, E1 4AH, Email: p.hajek@qmul.ac.uk Tel:  020 7882 8230.

A summary of the report from this study will be available upon request.

We would like to thank you for your interest in this study.

 

If interested please call or email Daisy on :

02078828244 or d.g.y.thompson-lake@qmul.ac.uk

Experts call for action on HIGH STRENGTH CIDER to protect the homeless and the vulnerable.

The Alcohol Health Alliance and Thames Reach, the homelessness organisation, are today calling for duty increases on high-strength cider, which is a leading cause of death and ill-health among the homeless.

Experts will present evidence on this issue at an event taking place in the House of Commons today, sponsored by David Burrowes MP, aimed at highlighting the impact of alcohol on the homeless and vulnerable.

High-strength ciders, including products like Frosty Jack’s and White Ace, are nearly all drunk by homeless and dependent drinkers, and studies show these ciders are a favourite among children receiving treatment for alcohol dependence. Studies have found that 75-85% of high-strength cider drinkers choose it because of its low price. At typically 7.5% ABV, three-litre bottles of these ciders, which contain the same amount of alcohol as 22 shots of vodka, can be bought for as little as £3.49. This equates to just 16p per unit.

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The calls will put further pressure on the government to act on cheap, high-strength ciders in the budget in March.

In December, 43 organisations and experts from drinkingthe health, homelessness, children’s and religious sectors wrote to the Chancellor urging him to increase the duty on cider, and earlier this month polling was released which showed that 66% of the public back a cider tax. In addition, the Institute for Fiscal Studies has previously called for reform to address “the very low levels of duty charged on strong cider”.

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance, said:

“A can of 500ml cider at 7.5% is taxed less than a third of the amount taxed on a can of beer the same size and strength. There can be no justification for the low rates of tax on high-strength cider.

“Our calls today are not about the drinks consumed by moderate drinkers. Dependent and vulnerable drinkers account for nearly all sales of high-strength ciders, meaning increased duty would be targeted at them. Indeed, we know that 80% of total cider sales would be left unaffected by duty increases on these high-strength ciders.

“The budget in March represents an ideal opportunity for the government to protect the homeless and vulnerable through increased cider duty.”

Jeremy Swain, Chief Executive of Thames Reach, said:

“98% of the homeless people we work with who have alcohol problems primarily drink bottles and cans of these high-strength ciders and super-strength beers, which are far stronger than regular and premium drinks. A survey of deaths among hostel residents over the past year showed that 10 out of 16 were directly attributable to high and super-strength drinks. This is not a one-off figure. An earlier survey showed 11 out of 14 deaths (78%) were caused by high and super-strength drinks.

“By increasing the tax on these high-strength and dangerous products, the harm done to the vulnerable people we work with will diminish, and the opportunity to reduce, and ultimately end, dependence on alcohol will increase.”

David Burrowes MP is sponsoring the event in Parliament and has long-campaigned locally and nationally about the harms of alcohol. Mr Burrowes said:

“The government has rightly put social justice at the heart of everything they do, and this commitment should extend to preventing the damage done by cheap, high strength drinks, which blight the lives and health of those who need our support – the homeless and vulnerable.

“An increase in the duty on high strength cider at the upcoming budget would represent a step in the right direction to tackling the burden of cheap alcohol on some of our most vulnerable communities.”

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About the Alcohol Health Alliance UK

The Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA) is a group of 50 organisations including the Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of GPs, British Medical Association, Alcohol Concern and the Institute of Alcohol Studies.

The AHA works together to:

  • Highlight the rising levels of alcohol-related health harm
  • Propose evidence-based solutions to reduce this harm
  • Influence decision makers to take positive action to address the damage caused by alcohol misuse

For further information, please contact Matt Chorley, the AHA’s Policy and Communications Officer, at matt.chorley@rcplondon.ac.uk.

About Thames Reach

Thames Reach is one of the UK’s leading homelessness charities. Its vision is to end street homelessness and its mission is to provide decent homes, encourage supportive relationships and help people lead fulfilling lives.

Thames Reach runs a range of services in London including street outreach services helping people sleeping rough escape homelessness, a variety of hostels and supported housing projects, and schemes which prevent homelessness and help people develop new skills, re-engage with family and friends, and get back into work.

Thames Reach has been campaigning for over a decade to raise taxation on the dangerous high-strength ciders and super-strength beers – all the major studies on alcohol indicate the price is one of the key factors in influencing what people drink – and have also called on the drinks industry to behave more responsibly.

Successes include the consumption of 9% super-strength beer falling by a quarter in the UK, after we successfully lobbied the Government to create a higher band of duty in 2011, while the drinks manufacturer Heineken removed all of its high-strength cider from sale in the UK after visiting one of our hostels.

See thamesreach.org.uk For further details, contact Thames Reach communications manager, Mike Nicholas, on mike.nicholas@thamesreach.org.uk.

 

 

Thinking about Drinking: A Year in the Life of an Alcohol Researcher at Stirling

Niamh was active in helping the media understand the implications of theniamhfitzgerald 2016 new alcohol guidelines. In this blog post she discusses what happened as a result of the publication of the new guidelines and how the media portray the facts in their own way.

By Niamh Fitzgerald, Research Profile, @NiamhCreate

Journalists love a good alcohol story, especially at this time of year, and January 2016 gave them the ideal ammunition with the publication of new advice from the UK’s Chief Medical Officers (CMOs) designed to provide people with ‘accurate information and clear advice about alcohol and its health risks’.  For the first time, the guidance advised that ‘no level of regular drinking can be considered completely safe’ and advised the same limit for both men and women – not to regularly drink above 14 units of alcohol (about 1 and a half bottles of wine) per week, at the same time moving away from the previous daily limits.  The guidance was based on a lengthy process involving experts from around the UK including Prof. Gerard Hastings (from Stirling) and followed emerging evidence on the links between alcohol and cancer – kicking off a furore of media coverage.

Media coverage following the publication of the new guidelines

The Daily Mail led with the news that the guidelines would ‘put a stop to the belief that red wine is good for you in moderation, while the Sun also focused on this ‘plonk lovers’ shock’ as the CMO’s ‘rubbished’ the supposed health benefits of wine.

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Others focused on the cancer risk, with the Scotsman leading with ‘drinkers at risk of cancer from single glass of wine’; whereas the Telegraph headline was ‘health chiefs attacked for nanny state alcohol guidelines’.  It was a frantic week for colleagues and I at the Institute for Social Marketing (ISM) as we sought to capture all of the newspaper, television and radio coverage for future analysis.  As Lecturer in Alcohol Studies at ISM, and lead for teaching and public engagement on alcohol for the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS), I was interviewed about the new guidelines on BBC News for their ‘Ask This’ feature, which takes questions from viewers.  I also had a comment piece published in The Scotsman. Continue reading